A Game for Aircraft Mechanics!

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by The Duke 1 week ago.

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  • #30598

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps

    I just do not know what to say about this one, but I guess that some may derive pleasure from delving into the box of tricks of old aircraft!

    Out next Wednesday on Steam.

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  • #30601

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,431

    Thanks Ed, I won’t be playing this myself, but sent it to my No.2 gson, who has Steam on his PC.

    As an Aircraft Technician (not Plane Mechanic) I worked on several fixed and rotary winged aircraft, patched quite a few holes in the Aden and Borneo conflicts. I had the eye and the steady hand for it then. In those days the AAC had only two trades: Airframes and Engines (my trade, known as ‘Blackies’ with no racial connotations) and Electronics and Instruments. (‘Greenies’, no one seemed to know where that came from.)

    Nowadays those trades are subdivided – the former E&I is now Avionics, which is further subdivided. I have two fairly local mates, both ex – Greenies. One had a business selling beds from an ex-RAF building, a former barrack block, in what was once RAF Manby. The other owns a farm and Farm Shop a few miles from Skegness. I became a Motor Engineer and workshop foreman: we all seem to have diversified in our careers. From contacts with other ex-service pals I know, only one worked with aircraft before retirement, maintaining helicopters for Philips Conoco, the Oil people. Those fly over us from time to time towards the North Sea rigs and not one has fallen out of the sky yet, so he must have left a good working legacy!

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #30692

    Drezha
    Participant
    @drezha
    Forumite Points: 706

    Might be an interesting evening or two for the cadets there. I’ve got them playing with Simpleplanes on GOG. Teaches them some of the basics of aerodynamics as well as figuring out a power to weight ratio and structure! Might also get them Kerbal Space Program as well, as they’re looking to teach us more space stuff through the cadets shortly.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Drezha.
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    #30695

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 2,134

    My BiL is an AT, ex raf now for a private American Co in afghan, I doubt that he will fancy playing AT in his down time. Maybe in 20 years when he has hung his slammers up. (or whatever they use) .

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    #30711

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,431

    Think you meant your BIL hanging up his spanners Steve (no offence meant)

    After I left aircraft work and the Army, I went straight into vehicle work, studied motor engineering in my spare time and eventually became a workshop foreman. The new work was very different, including engines, which did not include gas turbine engines. This meant that I didn’t really miss aircraft work and still to this day, I miss working on vehicles much more than I miss working on aircraft.* I worked on a lot of Classics after the owner got involved in importing and restoring them. As a bit of an old Classic myself, that was my favourite work.😆

    Anyone carrying out aircraft work in my day, had something called a “Shadow Board”. This was a long triangular shaped, lockable, glass-fronted cupboard which held all the tools. Each tool had its own shadow on the board, with MOD part number. All the boards were checked and locked by the crew chief, accompanied by a Tech Officer, at the end of a working day (or night) No one wanted to find a spanner or screwdriver, wrapped around the controls of a crashed aircraft!

    I think your BIL may be the same after retirement and/or leaving his present job: as ex-HMF yourself, your civvy working life has taken a different path. I think most of us do that, although in my case I have had many different jobs and careers, got used to being able to change direction. I have a mate who was a very good REME VM (vehicle mechanic) joined the Police force and made Sergeant quickly, he retired as a Superintendent I believe. I saw him years later when he was a police sergeant. He was taking myself and 2 other witnesses to Crown Court for a GBH and Attempted Murder trial. We both burst out laughing when we saw each other in those circumstances, he said at least he wasn’t cuffing and escorting me in a police van! Rather unfair I thought.😊😋

    *If a car breaks down, the driver can usually pull over and call recovery. If an aircraft breaks down, it often falls out of the sky. Not a good result.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #30716

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 2,750

    Most industries have simple visual check systems to make certain that forgetfulness does not kill. Tags are regularly used when working on electrical substations and are similarly used in the chemical industry for isolation systems. In both cases forgetting to isolate something, or forgetting to remove the isolation afterwards could result in a dangerous situation.

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    #30729

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 2,134

    They still use the shadow boards bob. Can’t be leaving tools inside airframes or left to be blown around Helo pads.

    Same is used in his private job too. A shadow board can’t be beaten by tech, some times the old ways just work. As Ed said, the tools are taged also so it’s known who checked out what tool. I assume it’s some type of NFC set up, so it’s instant and doesn’t stop the flow of work. But that’d an assumption. Im also assigning his usa bace he is currently on uses the same type of set up.

    Ive not had a chance to stay on his afghan base, but did stay on his RAF bases quite often, and once on, as he was a Sgt, he’d show me around the exiting bits.

    Also my high school used them too, to keep an eye on tools.

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