Other Stuff A Light on Dark Matter!

This topic contains 27 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 4 months ago. This post has been viewed 576 times

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  • #12557

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    • @grahamdearsley
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    Im with Einstein on this one. Best to look for a simple explination. Look at the early astronomers who came up with complicated equasions and tables to explain the movements of some strange stars they saw in the sky. If you follow their methods you get the right results but for all the wrong reasons !

    #12559

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    • @grahamdearsley
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    I forgot to mention the second part of my thinking on waves and also quantum (sub atomic) strangeness..

    If space IS full of static sub atomic particles then all waves can be compression waves. All water waves are compression waves and you only get to see the classic sinusodal shape at the boundry between two medium, in this case air and water.

    This may explain why quantum energy seems to travel in packets. Really haven’t looked into this though.

    The other thing is these things are smaller than photons and really must travel faster than light to carry the energy they do.

    Traveling faster than light may explain why things appear to be in two places when you try to look at them with photons and also that bit about just looking at them destroying the effect.

    As before just a thought 😊

    #12569

    Bob Williams
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    • @bullstuff2
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    Photons ARE light.

    Only Muhammad Ali could travel faster than light:

    I’m so fast that last night I turned off the light switch in my hotel room and was in bed before the room was dark.

    But he also said this:

    I am the greatest, I said that even before I knew I was. ”

    So I begin to doubt his FTL speech.

    β€œIf you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

    #12600

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    • @grahamdearsley
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    Yes Bob photons ARE light and these things are smaller.

    I would not DARE to quertion Eignsteign about the behaviour of normal sized matter 😊

    #12601

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    • @grahamdearsley
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    Here is a question

    A photon enters your eye and is detected when it hits your retina.

    I am assuming the photon gives up its energy during the impact so you can detect it but what happens to the photon ?

     

    #12603

    Ed P
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    • @edps
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    No idea wrt eyes, but generally speaking when a photon hits an object part is absorbed and part reflected/scattered. The part that is scattered generally speaking has the same wavelength as the incident photon, but we tend to see it as a measure of surface roughness or structure. TheΒ  story does not end with the bit that is absorbed as most often a lower energy photon is emitted/reflected out of the object. The wavelength of this is a characteristic of the material that was hit and we see this as colour. For example when sunlight shines on a leaf, the blue portion of the light is absorbed and the red-green bit reflected back out. see link for a better more full description. (you need an ir camera to see the red bit)

    There are exceptions (there always are) to this generalization – first florescence and rather than my just regurgitating stuff see the wiki. Phosphorescence the second exception is something else again and can be quite beautiful on some tropical beaches. I believe you can sometimes see in on West Country beaches but I have never been lucky enough to see it.

    #12605

    Bob Williams
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    • @bullstuff2
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    A perfect explanation Ed, thank you!

    Light is also heat of course, albeit a miniscule amount: possibly a few dozen (?) photons entering the eye energises the optic nerve, as well as the chemical reactions inside the eye.

    Biology and the workings of the human eye, not my strong point.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by Bob Williams.

    β€œIf you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

    #12608

    Ed P
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    • @edps
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    I simplified the scattering bit and only dealt with direct reflection. Due to the vector components of the photon the scattered light from irregular surfaces has apparently different wavelengths depending on the scattering angle and the surface of the target material. Wikipedia has a lbetter definition.

    The wiki on Compton scattering is a bit funky in that it somehow assumes that this obviates light being packets of energy (does no such thing imo)

    #12610

    Bob Williams
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    • @bullstuff2
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    Light and Heat.

    I remember as a child, getting the garden ready for winter and asking dad how a greenhouse works. He had no technical explanation, so he did what dad always did: went to the library and brought home a book that we read together. This demonstrates that explanation that I read so long ago, reading it is one of those events I recall as a child, firing my imagination and showing me that reading can help to educate oneself. And providing further proof that I had a very wise father.

    How a greenhouse changes light and heat, to heat up the interior of the greenhouse and enable plants to survive whilst outside temperatures would not allow them to live: –

    http://tinyurl.com/y87mfd2c

    β€œIf you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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