Arthritis?

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This topic contains 371 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by PlaneMan 1 day, 9 hours ago.

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  • #2248

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman

    Some will remember my topic on MM about my hands (and now hip).

    I saw the consultant today and my hip is mildly wrecked. The cartilage on the ‘socket’ part is worn and has a tear in it. That explains the increased pain I have while walking and moving it anyway apart from straight forward  or back. The consultant was happy to say it was a ‘one of those things’ situation until I showed him my swollen ,bright red fingers.

    I had bloods done and I’m having a MRI on my hands tomorrow. The first one was done when the fingers weren’t inflamed so he’s hoping that something will show this time.

    I’m seeing the physio monday and the consultant a week today, hopefully it’s better news than the referral to a surgeon which was going to happen today but has been delayed while I continue to confuse medical science.  :unsure:

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  • #29013

    Richard
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    @sawboman
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    That is good news at an otherwise cold and uncomfortable time of year. Now try to enjoy all upcoming seasonal events. I do wonder if the DWP have finally realised that you can manage something better if you don’t just say “No!” to everything?

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    #29019

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
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    Richard, I doubt the DWP have ever realised anything!!!

    I suspect that the evidence was so strong in my favour that it was a quick rubber stamp to get onto the next case which might be weaker.

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    #29062

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
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    Today I had another field trip, this time to the Arms Park to see if it was practical/ sensible for me to go and watch the Cardiff Blues in the future.

    It was all arranged by autism support worker and she met me there. I’m amazed how helpful they were. Rhiannon, the woman that showed us around and answered many questions, was superb. It seems that the best option for me would be at the River Taff end, a selection of first floor enclosed boxes wich cost no more than anywhere else as they are for the disabled. They also have balconies if you want to get some fresh air.

    Parking was also addressed,  disabled spots can be reserved in advance in the Arms Park but you have to be in at least 90 minutes before the game and are the last to leave. If I have a panic attack or feel uncomfortable that’s no good. Rhiannon mentioned that there is parking next door at the Principality Stadium (Millennium Stadium to me) but it’s not available for all games, they need 10 minutes notice at most to let a car out. It means a longer walk, sorry, hobble, but I reckon it’s worth it.

    Just need to find a game that’s not going to be super busy but good and fits with my issues.

    Almost forgot, carer/helper gets a free ticket!!!

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    #29340

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
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    I had the sharps and self injection training today, absolute doddle too do. The dose is in single use ‘pens’ which makes everything very easy.

    Hopefully my stomach will start getting better now.

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    #29342

    The Duke
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    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 2,448

    Many years ago I had get taught how to give the wife injections for a blood clot. I was terrible at it. She ended doing them herself. I just couldn’t do it. I realised I was a wimp that day.

    I could probably do a pen type one to myself, but not the wife. And if I ever had to give myself a proper injection like diabetes injection I’d probably fail and die.

    Strange thing is, I have no issues with injections, I give blood 3 or 4 times a year too.

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    #29344

    Bob Williams
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    @bullstuff2
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    I’m like that Steve: as you can probably imagine, this year has been all about needles. I don’t mind them, I can watch them going in and whatever comes out or goes in does not bother me. But I think I would have trouble doing it myself. Having said that, it comes down to “This will save my life. Do I want to live or not?”

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #29349

    Ed P
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    @edps
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    One of my jobs involved a lot of ‘bush’ travel in Africa. I should have realised that it was a dodgy number as the preparation for the trips involved me getting pretty close to medical combat training. The full works; including use of styrettes, blood expanders, tourniquets, pain relief etc. Plus a crash course in recognising and applying emergency treatment for Cerebral Malaria. I made the mistake of asking how was I supposed to self-administer blood expander and was told that the training was not for me, but so that I would be able to treat anyone I was travelling with! (car crashes, and running off the road were major hazards).

    • This reply was modified 5 months ago by Ed P.
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    #29352

    Ed P
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    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,227

    Postscript

    The training was just sufficient to stabilise someone enough to be able to urgently medivac them as the Company was paranoid about the risk of Aids in the local hospitals .

    I never did have the guts to ask my boss whether he had been trained – I just did not want to have my suspicions confirmed. . .

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    #29360

    Richard
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    @sawboman
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    Our eldest daughter spent 7.5 months of each of her two successful pregnancies self injecting every day, you can do it if the need arises. She has a blood condition that killed off three previous pregnancies so I guess she had an incentive plan. My wife spent five days every two/three weeks according to which chemo she was having, injecting her own abdomen. She also felt it was a vital step, so got on a did it, others called out the district nurse…

    PM (Steve?) make sure you always have a few injector pens ‘in hand’. At one point my daughter had a few faulty batches where many failed and she had to have the town scoured for fresh items, scrounging a few from different pharmacies. Otherwise they are pretty good and easy to use.

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    #29361

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
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    Richard, Steve is Duke, no problem.

    I’m back up there in 4 weeks, check up. Also my bloods have been ramped up, 2 weeks initially then monthly for 3 months rather than the 3 monthly it is now.  Folic acid 6 times a week instead of 3 times as well.

    Next time I’m up there I should, bloods being as they should, have 12 weeks  worth and then it’d be handed of the the GP surgery.

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    #29384

    Bob Williams
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    @bullstuff2
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    My daughter cannot stand the sight of blood or to be injected, she usually faints. (which is helpful, lol!) When she has had to come see me in various hospitals and wards, I could see her blanch at all the stuff hanging off various parts of me. Which is why I loved her so much for coming anyway, and told her so. But if someone came to take blood, she would have to leave until done.

    Strangely enough, her daughter our 13 yo gdaughter is unmoved and actually wants to know what’s happening. That probably comes from her dad, who has had to catch mum a few times when she faints.

    Son says he can stand the sight of anyone’s blood but his own.

    EDIT: Richard if I say “Steve” it means The Duke. I refer to the other Steve as “Stevie P.” Hope that clears it up, but no worries.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #29724

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
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    Went to see the Chronic Pain Management people today. Waste of my time and theirs.

    The doctor was baffled why I was referred to them as on reading my notes anything that the NHS could offer has been tried, except an exercise referral which is done by the GP anyway.  Not amused.

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    #29729

    Richard
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    @sawboman
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    That was a pretty grim out turn after all of the waiting about. There does appear to be a growing(?) issue of NHS not knowing how to deal with many pain cases and just ignoring that there could be a problem and blustering through, or trying to score a goal and passing people off to the first outlet that fails to duck. Having failed with the ignore and bluster method applied to my wife on Friday, today she went drugged up on Tramadol, Co-codimol and amitriptyline and, for the first time the session lasted only 20 minutes and radiotherapy was said to have been successfully done, yippee. Only 3 more weeks to go.

    Returning to you PM, if your trouble is ‘only’ arthritis, (by ‘only’ I mean if it is just arthritis and not complicated by other issues), that is enough to be going on with, but I do wonder if there are other issues in play. There is not enough effort to take a whole person view of what is going on. I have seen far to much of that to know that looking in the wrong place for the wrong thing, is just not going to end well. Sometimes a few pounds on the right blood tests can and has resolved several years of messing about.

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    #29730

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 1,917

    Richard, I also have joint hypermobility. My hands used to be extremely flexible, probably still are but the pain stops me finding out. I also suffer from it in my other joints but my wrists are very bad now, they dislocate daily. I don’t worry about it as it’s a stab of pain and they are back in place and working as normal.

    I’m waiting on a more comprehensive blood test result, either tomorrow or wednesday, since my change over to injections of methotrexate. The phlebotomist insisted on me waiting for 15 minutes after she drew blood as it was a lot of blood taken.

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    #29733

    Richard
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    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,007

    I don’t think I fall into the joint hypermobility group though one daughter does. I was told many years ago that my joints were very free, so would normally dislocate rather than break bones. One knee could and would ‘fall out to order’. So when I had an office accident I both broke my ankle bone and dislocated the foot to somewhere up the leg, ouch.

    My wife has a lung condition, at one time thought to be a heart problem for several years until resolved by a simple blood test. She also has mixed connective tissue disease, that one could apply to your joint pain issue as an alternative vector to follow. It is very painful and movement limiting, it needs a form of chemical cosh to control the pains, but the cosh of choice is not thought compatible with her cancer treatment.

    Still on the bright side, the radiotherapy went correctly for the first time today, so I happily brought home a drugged zombie, no driving, operating machinery or signing contracts for her for the next few weeks.

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    #29735

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
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    I’m seeing the GP next week (thank whichever deity you wish, or not, for online appointment checking and booking) so I may well bug him about that. Thanks.

    Glad it went O.K. with the wife.

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    #29797

    PlaneMan
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    @planeman
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    Went to a Stress Control course today, met my Autism support worker there.

    All I can say is it bloody better work, not been that stressed in years. I get stressed easily. 95 minute panic attack, which apparently is very unlikely.

    If I could walk I’d have been out of there in seconds. Lots of big women congratulating each other on making it through the door. Loudly. And they were late. Very late. 2 of them bought lunch in, a takeaway, oriental, very pungent. And they reeked of strong tobacco.

    If you’ve ever seen the I.T Crowd episode Calamity Jen, the people holding the course were very close to being like the stress expert in the episode.

    My autism support worker reckons  that about 50% won’t bother with the next week, let alone completing the 6 week course. I hope she’s correct.

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    #29801

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,007

    Sorry that it was a bit of an initial waste of time, but I do agree that attendance at such things tends to mix two types, keen and gadflies. My wife found this even with her cancer care, some people just did not bother to come after the first or second appointment. One even went as far as to simply bin the injections she was superposed to have for 5 days after each bout of chemo, predictably she did not turn up for her first post operative check up…

    I was luckier with most of my group physio session, the crowd who started were keen to recover unlike those you encountered who appeared to treat it as a day out or even a lunch club. Hopefully focus will turn onto really doing things to help; though if the subscription list falls too far the sessions could get cancelled. Sometimes it is not unknown for 6 ~ 10 starters to be one or two after the second week, hopefully the losers will be the ‘lunch and jollies club members’, who I appreciate sounded like a real pain in the behind. I wish you a better session next time round.

    Happily my wife’s radiotherapy appears to have got back on track and I have to say that the whole crowd we have meet there have been really nice people, ready to share situations and concerns tactfully and support each other. It has been a surprisingly uplifting experience, though darned tiring with 50 mile round trips every day except weekends. Sadly, it is obvious that several are drinking at the last chance saloon. After all the research I have done it can be difficult to avoid letting the realisation that a cliff edge is approaching for them, so that is the downside and a stress promoter. You do not know if they are brave, stoic or not really aware and recognising their situation.

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    #29818

    Bob Williams
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    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,935

    Richard your observations of those receiving Radiotherapy, match my own experiences of the Chemotherapy “club” members at Grimsby DPoW hospital.

    It has been a surprisingly uplifting experience… ” – definitely! Everyone became friends within minutes of meeting and speaking for the first time, everyone sharing sweets, biscuits and reading material. Jokes about one’s own troubles/physical appearance were common.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #29821

    JayCeeDee
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    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 1,165

    Jokes about one’s own troubles/physical appearance were common.

    So very true, Bob. Staring your mortality in the eye is very enlightening and empowering. Jokes were often self -oriented- almost taking the mickey out of yourself to lighten the mood!!

    I always remember the occasion when one elderly lady who was on Chemo and was wearing an “ice-cap” for the duration of her infusion, saying out loud to the room ” The last time I wore a blue beret was in the Girl Guides, and I’m not saying how many years ago that was!!” The whole room just laughed together – Chemo is a very shared, communal experience. We were all in it together, some for better, some, tragically, for worse.

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