Arthritis?

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This topic contains 330 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 1 day, 12 hours ago.

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  • #2248

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman

    Some will remember my topic on MM about my hands (and now hip).

    I saw the consultant today and my hip is mildly wrecked. The cartilage on the ‘socket’ part is worn and has a tear in it. That explains the increased pain I have while walking and moving it anyway apart from straight forward  or back. The consultant was happy to say it was a ‘one of those things’ situation until I showed him my swollen ,bright red fingers.

    I had bloods done and I’m having a MRI on my hands tomorrow. The first one was done when the fingers weren’t inflamed so he’s hoping that something will show this time.

    I’m seeing the physio monday and the consultant a week today, hopefully it’s better news than the referral to a surgeon which was going to happen today but has been delayed while I continue to confuse medical science.  :unsure:

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  • #29823

    Richard
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    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,650

    How very true, in times of real personal troubles there is not ‘them and me’ it becomes just ‘us’. The stress has to be relieved somehow and humour including dark or black* humour is certainly the best way. Those undergoing radio for prostrate troubles joined in as freely as the rest with other forms – and this included the partners. One thing I did notice was that most of those with prostrate cancer were dark skinned, in contrast to those with other cancers who were more equally spread across ethnicities, though many spoke heavily accented English. The take-a-way is that everyone is equal and there can be a cancer or other serious illness for everyone.

    *Denotes the tone of the joking NOT the race or ethnicity.

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    #29826

    Ed P
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    @edps
    Forumite Points: 2,481

    Richard your observation on ethnicity and ailments is very true but something that is whispered rather than given a full airing for fears that it may be racist.Cancer Research has some broad brush stats.

    An Indian doctor friend said it was observed that people from the sub-continent suffer more circulatory diseases than others but the NHS never takes it into account when screening,

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    #29830

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,650

    Richard your observation on ethnicity and ailments is very true but something that is whispered rather than given a full airing for fears that it may be racist.Cancer Research has some broad brush stats. An Indian doctor friend said it was observed that people from the sub-continent suffer more circulatory diseases than others but the NHS never takes it into account when screening,

    One of the real elephants in the room is that some medications are not suitable or are largely ineffective for some racial or ethnic groups. This unfortunate fact also applies to others within the otherwise treatable spectrum of patients. Some will respond, some will respond poorly and some will not respond at all, however, as you suggest exploring this issue is a taboo from which the politically incorrect will shout off all comers. Some theories suggest that the difference might be down to hereditary where immunities to some conditions may have evolved at the price of opening up reduced immunity to others. There is also the issue of each person’s biome causing differences in digestion and food processing capabilities with sometimes unwanted effects. I am aware of published data showing that some conditions are over and under represented within some groups.

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    #29864

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 1,550

    I saw the GP today, appointment booked a little while back.

    Just as well as on Sunday my right shoulder let off an almighty crack that had me lying on the floor in total agony. It does this periodically but nothing like the one on Sunday for over a year. My left shoulder also does it but nowhere near as bad as my right one.

    GP reckons it could well be the arthritis but need to arrange an x-ray. 🙄

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    #29870

    JayCeeDee
    Participant
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 956

    Don’t let them get away with an x-ray, Nolan. An MRI is what you need and you need to push for it.

    About 8 years ago after hurting her back when my computer chair at the time gave way and jolted her back, she was in agony. The GP referred her for an x-ray. It showed what they described as arthritis on the base of the spine. She knew this was likely so as she had worked on the stall on a street corner for 35 odd years. She put up with the pain for going on 3 years.

    When she asked the GP for a referral to a pain clinic she had heard about, they sent her for an MRI. This showed she had a disc out that had shrivelled over the years and couldn’t be manipulated back into place. It was lying against the sciatic nerve which explained the cramps in her leg, the spasms and the pain. It had been out too long and can now only be dealt with on the table, inserting nylon spacers that absorb the impact between the two vertebrae. She’s determined that that won’t happen until a wheelchair is the only viable option as she hates the thought of being out of action for three months on “take-it-easy rest”.

    Moral of the story is, don’t let them get away with a cheap general picture. Get them to have a good detailed look at it with an MRI.

    Best of luck.

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    #29874

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 1,550

    Thanks JCD.

    The GP did mention an MRI but also said that it was x-ray first, additional tests on my next bloods (2 weeks to go) and him contacting my rheumatologist for any insight he may have.

    Down here it’s all ‘this step first, then that one’ no jumping to the sensible options.

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    #29959

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 2,481

    One for you PM – Fevers make you feel happy!

    Not sure I can believe it, as  it implies that autistic people should gorge on cat food! (cats die if they have a low taurine diet)

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    #29960

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 1,550

    Thanks Ed, you find some cracking stuff!

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    #29962

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 2,481

    You are very welcome P.M.

    I have one gs who is borderline on the spectrum (no noticeable symptoms except an unwillingness to make eye contact), so I take an interest in the subject.

    I’m glad to say that of his own volition he has recently taken a liking to broccoli etc., but I think cat-food would be one step too far!

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    #29968

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,277

    ED wrote:

    I have one gs who is borderline on the spectrum (no noticeable symptoms except an unwillingness to make eye contact), so I take an interest in the subject. ”

    Should your gs develop full-blown Aspergers Ed, and you carry out research as I did, you may notice that the eye contact problem fades with members of his immediate family, and others that he has known well for a long time. I tried to work with it when my (now 25 yo gs) was quite young, by repeatedly instructing him to “Look me in the eye.” It worked and he gradually got better, but still cannot make eye contact with strangers, or people he has not known for very long.

    Other symptoms include a fierce determination to concentrate upon any task that strongly appeals to them. In the case of my gs, that was computing. I created a monster by building his first PC when he was around 9 or 10. He is now a first rate IT tech, specialising in building systems for contracts with his company, whose boss told me in all sincerity that he is his own right hand and he could not work without him. They have ‘tunnel vision’ which makes them work through any task with such concentration. Couple that with the high intelligence that most Aspergers people usually possess and you have any employer’s dream: the worker who does not give up until the job is done.

    He has now suddenly taken an interest in food and is trying out recipes, producing some wonderful meals. He invites family members to his apartment and uses them as guinea pigs! Grandma and granddad have eaten some of his meals and they are good-to- excellent. Another symptom of his Aspergers, by taking up some activity and chasing it down! Now he is developing an interest in Art, probably a result of getting closer to his 13 yo sister, who does not have any Autism but is developing into a polymath, getting A’s and A*’s at her grammar school in all subjects. That gives her a problem, in that she must this year choose the subjects she wishes to carry on with.

    I repeat what I have said in other posts about Autism in general and Aspergers in particular: I suspect it may be evolution in action amongst the last two generations, especially the latest.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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