Backups

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This topic contains 13 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 11 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #12105

    dwynnehugh
    Participant
    @dwynnehugh

    A friend of mine has just asked for an external HDD to backup his collection of photos – his ‘C’ drive is 1TB – do I get him a 1 or a 2TB ext HDD – there will come a time when his ‘C’ drive will be close to capacity and still 50% of his ext HDD available – give or take.

    I believed that a backup HDD was to ensure that you had a full copy of data etc on both int and ext HDDs?

    Your views please.

    To err is human, but forgiveness is not Tory policy!

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  • #12106

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 1,066

    If it’s raw files they will compress, if it’s jpegs they are already compressed. In any event I would go for at least 2TB to allow for multiple backups.

    Maxtor portable 1TB £47

    Toshiba Canvio portable  2TB £66

    Toshiba Canvio Desktop 3TB £77 (portable £90)

    Desktop or mobile 4TB £100

    Personally I would go for the desktop 3TB.

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    #12107

    Ed P
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    @edps
    Forumite Points: 1,731

    Just a tip to pass on to your friend, it is better not to try to compress photo files for two reasons:

    a) As Dave points out they are already in a compressed format.

    b) Where possible (and time permits)  any photo backup should be checked for corruption caused by the copying process.

    I do not have independent stats on file corruption but corrupt headers are fairly common. I’d guess that it could be at least 1:1000 that are corrupt in some way. From bitter experience, that number sky-rockets if you compress the jpg.

     

    JPG Checker is a checker for Windows. (not now free). I have used it in the past when it was free and it was fast and accurate.

    If he knows how to use Python then PIL is a good method as it actually loads and tests each image and prints out an exception for those that fail. Unfortunately this really only detects corrupt headers, not image glitches.

    Python code, (needs to be put in an appropriate loop):

    from PIL import Image

    v_image = Image.open(file)
    v_image.verify()

    If he knows Linux then jpginfo is a free way method.

    This is not an exhaustive list of methods, but rather to encourage your friend to do it if the photos are at all valuable. He can find more by searching on-line for  “check jpg files for corruption”

     

     

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    #12108

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 1,066

    Aimed at serious photographers only, Synology are touting their NAS with the BTRFS (Better File System) as it’s self healing.

    It’s only available on the high end chassis i.e. a 2 bay is nearly £400 without disks. But for a professional it’s money well spent.

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    #12111

    dwynnehugh
    Participant
    @dwynnehugh
    Forumite Points: 370

    Thanks one and all, I think without checking he’s a ‘happy snapper’ – holidays and suchlike, don’t think he’s into it in any professional way.

    He’s more into having a 2nd copy of his images which is why I asked the initial question – xTBs?  Obviously if he has a copy on his ‘C’ drive which is 1TB and gets a 2TB ext HDD there will come a time when his ‘C’ drive will not have the capacity to keep the same number of images as his external one.

    To err is human, but forgiveness is not Tory policy!

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    #12113

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 1,731

    A second copy of family stuff is always nice to have, but useless if it is corrupt. I’m not a pro but I was gutted to lose some photos I took in Bhutan. (a rare place at a rare time – a couple of years before they got TV).

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    #12120

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 1,066

    This chart is from a Synology course I went on. It’s based on years of looking at NAS drives.

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    #12128

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,804

    That is scary Dave.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #12137

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 1,731

    Do I read that correctly – One 1TB drive (full I guess) has a probability of ~10% that at least one byte on the drive will be totally corrupt? That actually sounds quite low so I’m probably misreading it .

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    #12153

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 1,066

    Here’s what I think. It’s not saying that with a 5 x 10TB array 99% of files would be unreadable, that’s clearly nonsense. What I take it to mean is that there is a 99% chance that there are unreadable files on there.

    So taking it back to someone with 2TB of files on a single drive, 1 out of 8 people will absolutely have some corrupt files. The problem is you can’t say who or how many or which ones (don’t give a damn about the temp drive). It’s Russian roulette.

    For us the occasional photo is a PITA, for a Wedding photographer that could be a real reputation issue. For historical archives, even personal ones like Ed’s, it’s potentially devastating.

    After the DVD dye issues we all see HDDs as a safe haven for our memories. Synology are just pointing out it isn’t necessarily so and there is an answer for those for who it really matters which doesn’t cost the earth.

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    #12154

    dwynnehugh
    Participant
    @dwynnehugh
    Forumite Points: 370

    Makes you wonder if in the ‘old days’ we were better off with albums!! 👅

    To err is human, but forgiveness is not Tory policy!

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    #12159

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,559

    This is the reason I have my family photos on a number of cloud sites Google, Flickr, then a mass dump on ms and mega.

    I now upload all photos via my phone and my phone sends all pics to their relevant places. I’ll then take the tile to put pics into albums in Google and flickr. But leave the other two as one big blob of photos.

    I no longer keep photos on a pc at home.

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    #12253

    blacklion1725
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    @blacklion1725
    Forumite Points: 614

    Very similar approach Duke – I still keep a local PC version as I find it easier for uploading non-phone pics. If I’m away I always take my little compact 30x zoom camera, copy the pics to the my PC/server and upload to flickr/google/onedrive from there. For phone pics my approach is exactly the same as yours.

    Very pleased that flickr is still around – got an email that Yahoo had sold it (I think) but hope it hangs on as it is a great service.

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    #12263

    Bob Williams
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    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,804

    Well I am left cursing the fact that I sold on the Slide & Negative Scanner * that I used to convert Fil’s old slides and neg’s to digital form. Daughter has just “found” some more slides, and even older B&W negatives. I considered buying another scanner, but would be faced with the same problem: when the “found” ones are converted, what use would it be? Have to sell another one, cheapest I have seen new is £55. So I asked at a Photographic shop in Louth: 100+ slides and 50+ neg’s, digitalised onto a CD and a USB drive, £80. Worth it to me, as they promise to use their software to edit each photo to make them all sparkly, better than my efforts. This way I can spread the pic’s around the family and let the grandbrats have a laugh at dad and auntie as babies and toddlers.

    I have all our photos on my NAS, external Hdd and Google Drive.

    *Thanks to someone here nagging me to move stuff on…

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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