Can someone who knows more educate me

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Wheels-Of-Fire 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #35464

    D-Dan
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    @d-dan

    I have no TV. All of my media consumption is on a dedicated 32″ computer monitor, with a max refresh rate of 75Hz, but usually at 60 Hz.

    Now, I have occasion to transcode video (usually using Handbrake), which allows me to set the framerate. Intellectually, I feel I should choose 30FPS, rather than PAL standard 24 FPS, since this is divisible by the monitor’s frequency, but is my intellect right.

    Does it make a difference, and will I even notice.

    e.g. a TS file (which will be either 24FPS or 29.97FPS depending on where it comes from) transcoded for my own system should be – what?

    Help me understand.

    Disclaimer: I wear glasses sometimes for watching, depending on how my eyesight is performing on that day. The monitor will be at around the limit between no glasses and specs, so is variable.

    Ryzen 7 1800X, 16 GB, 6 (yes - 6) HDs inc 2 SSDs, 4 RPi 3Bs + 1 RPi 4B - one as an NFS server with two more drives, PiHole (shut yours), Plex server, cloud server, and other random Pi stuff. Nice CoolerMaster case, NV GTX 1060 6GB, and a whopping 32" AOC 1440P monitor.

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  • #35465

    blacklion1725
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    @blacklion1725
    Forumite Points: 1,189

    PAL standard is 25 fps not 24. NTSC is just under 30 and “Film” is 24 (ish) – latter two are North American. When I re-encode anything I  leave the frame rate alone. Do a small section to test is the best bet.

    The other thing with TVs and monitors is the refresh rate – auto-mode or suck it and see. It is a complicated area that I used to know more about but since modern TVs etc. are so forgiving I tend not to bother too much as the rendering TV generally takes care of it.

    Generally I would say with a decent display be it a Telly or a monitor the less you do to the source video the better unless something is really wrong when you look at it.

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    #35466

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 1,640

    +1 on the frame rate

    PAL and NTSC are recorded at 25 and 30 fps respectively but they are transmitted at an interlaced FIELD rate of 50 and 60 which is equivalent to a refresh rate.

    In practice you will not see an interlaced picture on a flat screen because it will wait until it has recived 2 interlaced frames and then display them twice over 2 fields.

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    #35467

    D-Dan
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    @d-dan
    Forumite Points: 1,294

    OK, thank you. I tend to leave framerate alone, but wondered if I could be doing better.

    Now, H.264 v H.265. My reading tells me H.265 should be more compressed. I’m not convinced. I’ve transcoded the same video to both, and whilst H.264 ended at 2.1Gb, h.265 came in at 8.1Gb, which pretty much contradicts everything I’ve read, or am I completely misunderstanding?

    EDIT: For clarity. These are transcoded for a Plex server running on an RPi V4, with access outside of my local network.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by D-Dan.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by D-Dan.

    Ryzen 7 1800X, 16 GB, 6 (yes - 6) HDs inc 2 SSDs, 4 RPi 3Bs + 1 RPi 4B - one as an NFS server with two more drives, PiHole (shut yours), Plex server, cloud server, and other random Pi stuff. Nice CoolerMaster case, NV GTX 1060 6GB, and a whopping 32" AOC 1440P monitor.

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    #35470

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 1,640

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Efficiency_Video_Coding

    The above Wiki post tells you more than you probably need to know about H.265 HEVC.

    H.265 is capable of higher compression ratios for the same picture quality as H.264 but it is also capable of higher quality at higher bit rates.

    The size of your file will depend on what profile and tier/level your encoder is using 😊

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    #35472

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 1,640

    https://www.techspot.com/article/1131-hevc-h256-enconding-playback/page4.html

    Above are a few tips for Handbreak H.265 settings.

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    #35474

    Ed P
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    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,715

    H265 is a lossy compression, but you will not notice the difference other than a ~20% reduction in file size.

    The only time that I ever even think about frame rate is if I have to transcode something for Apple’s nasty iTunes (see Handbreak presets).

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    #35482

    keith with the teef
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    @thinktank
    Forumite Points: 806

    You should set your monitor refresh rate to match the fps of your media.

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    #35484

    D-Dan
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    @d-dan
    Forumite Points: 1,294

    The fps of the media is either 24, 29.something, or 30. The monitor is 60 Hzf (or 60 FPS), or 75Hz (75 FPS) – so not possible.

    Ryzen 7 1800X, 16 GB, 6 (yes - 6) HDs inc 2 SSDs, 4 RPi 3Bs + 1 RPi 4B - one as an NFS server with two more drives, PiHole (shut yours), Plex server, cloud server, and other random Pi stuff. Nice CoolerMaster case, NV GTX 1060 6GB, and a whopping 32" AOC 1440P monitor.

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    #35485

    Wheels-Of-Fire
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    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 1,640

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTSC

    To understand frame rate conversion better have a look at the frame rate conversion section under technical details in the above Wiki post.

    If you like you can read the whole thing and follow the links. I found it interesting 😊

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