Ebay Charity

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 8 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #14023

    johnbarry
    Participant
    @johnbarry

    Ebay Charity

    I sold an item on ebay with all proceeds (100% £7.50) going to
    British Heart Foundation.

    Paypal charged me 43p Ebay charged me £2.20. So now I have to pay £2.63 on top of the £7.50.

    I didn’t expect to pay fees (why not?) so was it worth donating all proceeds to charity, why is that facility even on ebay.

    I suppose it is the norm but maybe it’s not worth it, in theory I ended up donating £10.13 to charity, I only wanted to donate the sale price.

    Cheers
    John

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #14025

    dwynnehugh
    Participant
    @dwynnehugh
    Forumite Points: 347

    Hi John,

    The old saying ‘charity starts at home’ seems to be the order of the day with Ebay and Paypal (part of Ebay) – if this is the way you want to give to charity then I think you will have to accept that not 100% of the proceeds will arrive where you intended them to.

    When you see what some of the CEOs of these charities are paid – you might change your mind.

     

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    To err is human, but forgiveness is not Tory policy!

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    #14028

    johnbarry
    Participant
    @johnbarry
    Forumite Points: 1,131

    Thanks Dave

    changed my mind on future thoughts.

    Cheers
    John

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    #14030

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    I won’t give any to any charity. They are all rackets. Big, small and international, I’m yet to see one that isn’t in it for themselves first and for most.

    I don’t have issue with their top employees getting top money, that’s life you want the best person for the roll. But when you actively dig, these charities see such a small fraction of donations reach the ground.

    I’d be surprised if 20p of your £7. 50 (cough £10.50) made it to the ground level.

     

    I’ll donate time, I’ll even be a taxi if needed, Ill donate pc time, but I draw the line at cash.

    Small charities are the best.most start up for a good reason I’m sure, Ill child,  friend, family, etc, but they soon find there is a good living to be had.

    For me they are one step -above- sideways to benifit cheats. They beg for money from the public,  pay almost zero tax, while owning flash cars and having multiple  exotic hols.

    I know of a few like this local. One fella I had it out in the local once, he now avoids me.

    And the kicker is they say, “I raise money for (incert illness) for a living” thinking they are above the rest. Jog on. Or rather drive on in your £60k bmw

    Sadly everything in life is never what it looks. I need to start a charity……

    I’m not a fan of charities if you didn’t catch my tone.

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    #14047

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,649

    I have a monthly DD to Guide Dogs, NSPCC and McMillan Nurses. I have a blind mate who has had more than one dog and is very grateful for the ability to get out and about: I saw how it changed his life. NSPCC because I know a couple of people who were abused as children. One was our daughter’s mate as a child, who was sexually abused by her dad. Daughter was a witness whose evidence, and that of the girl’s kid brother, put him away. Her mother ignored it and would not believe it. We are extremely proud of our courageous daughter, who was threatened by the abuser and his wife. She told them to add assault and harrasment to their charges if they wanted. I told them something else.

    The other was me. Battered as a very young child by my mother, until dad found out. That brings it home to me that children need protection even from those who are supposed to protect them. Think about this: there is a Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, but the NSPCC is only a National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. The UK loves animals: how much do UK citizens love children?

    McMillan because they looked after my dad and allowed me to carry on working and getting sleep while he got on with dying. They did the same for my brother and my FIL.

    I know, Steve, that some charities are a fraud, but there are ways to look into that.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #14048

    johnbarry
    Participant
    @johnbarry
    Forumite Points: 1,131

    While most things said (Duke) I agree. But like Bob it’s worthy for a specific charity. I chose The  Heart Foundation (on ebay) I have a Heart Condition.

    But then it is a lot to be said about Bobs choice of McMillan Nurses, my partner has just been diagnosed with breast cancer and the mac nurses are helping loads.

     

    Cheers
    John

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    #14050

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    Mcmillan do alot at our local hospital, advising people what benifits and help is avalible, and they the most simple and most valuable thing they do imo is give people a symathetic ear. However just like the legion or help the heros, the more we fund them (both decent causes in their own right, well Help the heros is not held in high as regard as it once did), the more the government lean on them.

    I spoke to soon about my no cash rule. The hospice that looked after my nan her last weeks, I’ve donated to, however most years they ask for hampers or time, over cash. They are quite well funded from wills apparently.

    If we could do an over haul top to bottom of the NHS I’m sure no charity would be needed. However then we would have alot more unemployed, which isn’t good for the economy. Simple facts is, emptying people is cheaper and more beneficial than having them on benefits.

    I have a lot of respect to people that do voluntary work, I’d just say don’t do it cos you support what the charity does, first look at how said charity is run, if the two seem fair then go for it. Though few charities in my eyes pass them both.

    This was my first year I didn’t by a poppy too, simply cos when a charity is now forced on the country, crucifing people on TV that don’t wear a poppy, I’m out. I have no issue with people saying “I’d don’t support x charity” even if I do. But poppy day is now too much for me.

    I’m not the the only one with this view, I often speak to the old guys and girls around November who are selling, and I was amazed many shared my opinion. Though I must admit I must of chucked a tenner in the tins over the periods, as I could not speak to the guys and not donate. I just refused the poppy. Makes me a total hypocrite, as “I don’t give cash to charity”, but there is have the view, then just being an arse in person.

    Though I could of just walked past the guys, but I like the stories they love to tell.

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    #14077

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,649

    The one single annoying charity activity for me, is the number of Charity Collection Bags we get here in the Senior’s Ghetto. I know I have moaned about this before, but I have been asking around the village and most people outside of our Close do not get the same number that we do. That means we oldpharts are being targetted, which is disgusting. I have given up now: I save up all the bags and wait until a charity van comes into the Close, then give them ALL to one driver. If they don’t take them, I make sure they see me chuck them in the Recycle Bin. How much stuff do they think we have? As I pointed out to one of them, it is younger people who have more stuff than we oldies, who tend to hang onto things and use them until they fall apart.

    Of course that makes me a miserable old bugga, until I point out the contributions I make.

    The Poppy game has become ridiculous: example – just before Rememberance Day, I had bought one and not noticed it had fallen off. Passed a young Girl Guide Poppy seller with SWMBO, who was wearing one. “Oh so your wife has a Poppy, do you want one?” – “No thank you, I bought one but it obviously fell off.”

    “But don’t you want a replacement, to help veterans?” – in a very haughty voice.

    “Well,” I said patiently, “I have two objections to that, young lady. One – I am a veteran and served 12 years. Two – my granddaughter has been in Guiding since a child and is now actually your local Leader. Her name is (–) do you know her?” – “Er, yes.” – “Do you think she would like you talking to her grandad like that?”

    “No.” – “Don’t worry, I won’t tell her. But remember the principles and aims of Guiding, one of which is respect for elders. Now carry on with the excellent work: you are doing a great job.”

    (Faint voice) “OK thank you.”

    When I pass a War Memorial, I always remember fallen comrades, I bare and bow my head. That causes amusement sometimes, but I don’t care. It’s my tribute and it can happen at any time of the year. When I pass a certain Home where I last saw a mate dribbling into his shirt, I always feel the pain. That is real and it doesn’t depend upon buying a piece of red and green paper, once a year.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #14082

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    Do you ex service persons (nice and pc there), become very cynical years after they leave. Or is that just age?

    A few weeks ago I was having a session at an old friends house, and he asked would you go in and fight for this government. My instant answer was no. But on reflection in the late 90s I went, under Blair leadership. Then we never knew of his lies and illegal invasion plans etc, but many more since have joined knowing this.

    So my answer would be, at 30+ (I’m really stretching out 30s lol) would I, hell no, but if I was 16 and knew f all about the world I would. Not cos of any national allegiance, but because it was the most fun ever.

    If I knew then of the  political BS of the world, and what our role is, then no. I’d have no issues if I, or God forbid, one of my kids was killed in a proper war that actully meant something, but for them to of died in Afghanistan or Iraq, I don’t think I could take that. And thats the reason when son 2 was 16 me and mother, wouldn’t sign his papers for the infantry. He has gone on to become a gas fitter now.

    Son 1, that went uni, was going to go back and do anther course, minor surgery (or the like), but once he for induction out the Raf and navy would pay for him to do it, (they would of his first course, but he knew best lol), he decided to go down that route.

    However while he was waiting for his navy intake date, he scored a job with boots as a trainee chemist. He still says he is going to go the navy route, but now the pressure is off, given he now has a career, and not just a job. Also his starting wage is more than I ever got paid working for someone else!!!

    Quite proud of the little (bigger than me) shit.

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    #14083

    Drezha
    Participant
    @drezha
    Forumite Points: 349

    I’d have to look through my previous eBay records but I don’t think I’ve ever done a 100% sale, so I was always expecting charges to my account. I usually put 10% towards the RAFBF whenever I sell.

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    #14099

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,649

    Looking back at myself in teen years, I was just trying to get away from home and a one-job village. I was raised, as most of my generation, on a diet of British and Hollywood films about war and how glorious it was. Then the ads told us all about foreign places and I was sold. On reflection, I would say that actual military active service was about 95% boredom and 5% pants-filling fear. When one of your mates is killed or injured, you don’t think “I’m going to GET them!” as in the books and movies. You just think, for one split second, “Glad it’s him and not me!” and try to put a round or two in the ones trying to do that to you and all your other mates.

    Then you try to help, if you can. The uniform looks better without holes in it.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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