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External network cable

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    Topic
  • #61319
    Participant
    Tippon
    @tippon

    I need to run some cabling across the front of my house to get a reliable connection downstairs. Do I need anything specific, or do I just need to look for external cable? Could I use something like this, depending on whether I want a plug or to wire it into a box?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/MutecPower-Outdoor-waterproof-Ethernet-Network/dp/B00EOTHDWQ/

    I’ve got a crimper, but if I want to put sockets on the walls would I be right in saying that I’d need a push down tool and some face plates like these?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/VCE-Socket-Network-Double-Plate/dp/B083BKBRSW

    I’m going to attempt to do it properly and have a double socket at each point, all tacked nicely to the wall, and going into a nice set of switches in either the garage or attic. Whether it works out that way is another matter though :wacko:


    @bdthree
    I can’t post in the networking/hardware section for some reason.

Viewing 11 replies - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #61327
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 16,928

    I put in some CAT5e external cable a few years ago and it worked just fine.The stuff is black to give it some UV protection so you may need some trunking for aesthetic reasons or to stop malignant squirrels chewing it. Above all avoid sharp bends as the wires inside the cable can be fairly frail. I’d guess you will need a cheap impact tool for the wall plate as most cat5 plates need it.

    Add a network cable  tester to your list as you could drive yourself daft without one.

    There are plenty of good how-tos on the web.

    My only question is why cat6? It is far harder to install and a bit more expensive. I do like the idea of buying cables with RJ45 connectors already on as it means you can test the continuity in the cable before you start. I once made the mistake of buying some cheap cat5 that I’ll swear had random cable breaks every twenty metres or so – that burned up more in time than the money I saved.

    #61331
    Participant
    Dave Rice
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 9,540

    I agree with everything you’ve both said, especially the Cat 6 comment. Cat 6 is a total PITA because of the internal plastic X brace that keeps the pairs apart. It gives you a bend radius of an oil tanker.

    You can use any old Cat 5e, especially if it’s going in trunking, but the proper stuff has and ED says UV and a tougher jacket. If just done an Amazon search on external Cat 5e, take your pick. You don’t need to spend a fortune on a Krone punch down tool, around a fiver. I’d look for a deal with a cable stripper and / or a cable tester, like this. Follow the ‘B’ pattern you’ll see on the socket, plugs are wire up like this

    Cable testers, the basic ones are basically battery and lamp and will show connectivity but not if you’ve screwed the pairs up or if there’s a break in the cable. This one will flash the pairs up in sequence so you can see if the same number flashes at the same time on the remote (you’ll need the Mrs to help here).  I use this one myself, but I have 8 remotes so I can test a lot in one location.

    EDIT – the only time we use Cat 6 is on MOD jobs because they insist on it, even for a 5mbps CCTV camera. It also has a very high grade jacket to cut down on smoke and particles in a fire. Costs >£200 a box and we can’t get it form our suppliers so they get it for us! Typical MOD decision making, you won’t be fired by going for the highest spec. In this case it’s the second highest as no-one in the world makes the highest!

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by Dave Rice.
    #61381
    Participant
    Tippon
    @tippon
    Forumite Points: 4,139

    That’s odd, the link I sent myself was to this cat 5e cable:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00I71B0O4/

    I don’t know how I linked the cat6 :wacko:

    Thanks for the replies, it’s good to know I’m on the right track for once :unsure: I forgot to mention, I’ve got a cable tester from when I was supposed to do the old house (12 years and counting… :scratch: )

    My thinking at the moment is to have the garage as the hub, as it’s under two of the bedrooms and is cold in the winter. I’m hoping that as it’s cooler, the media system and any networking equipment will warm it in winter, and be cooler in the summer, plus there won’t be the noise from the media system in the living room.

    We’ve got a split level house with two living rooms, so I thought four sockets in the upstairs main living room, and two in the downstairs room, then another four sockets in the downstairs office. The office shares a wall with the garage, so I can just go through the wall for them. I thought one cable per socket for the living rooms, rather than switches etc. so that there’s an element of future proofing (I know, I know). We’ve got a 4K TV upstairs, and anything new will be 4K going forwards, plus I’ll need some sort of wifi in there for the phones and laptops, so there’ll be less chance of any bottlenecks with the extra cabling. Possibly a wifi point in the garage to overcome the current signal issues, but it depends on where the router ends up.

    We’re looking to switch to FTTP if I can get any sense out of Talktalk, but as it will need a new entry point into the house, I thought I could put that in the garage and share it from there. A cable or two from the garage to the attic to finish off, and then a wifi device or two up there too (it’s a wide house). If the wifi from the attic covers the living room, then I can just use a switch in the living room for the Xbox and other consoles.

    I’ve just realised as I’m typing it out that if I move the router downstairs, I’ll only need one pair of sockets in the upstairs living room. The router *should* give a wifi signal to the office and bedrooms, so I might only need a wifi device in one of the living rooms (one’s above the other), depending on whether either of them reach the kitchen and bathroom upstairs. An extender to the garden would be nice, but that’s a future upgrade, in the same vein as an attic conversion and the cabling that will go with it.

    So, have I missed anything? :wacko: :mail:

    #61383
    Participant
    Dave Rice
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 9,540

    OK, a kill two birds with one stone product: the wall port with Ethernet and Wifi

    Ubiquiti with a free cloud controller and set up link

    TP-Link EAP225-Wall Omada AC1200 free software but needs a host PC link

    Both only need a single Ethernet cable. I will be using the Ubiquiti in a new project for a mates physio clinic refurb, but the Omada dedicated controller is quite reasonable so…

     

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by Dave Rice.
    #61386
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 16,928

    ‘Spiders!’

    I have all my external kit in the garage. As you say it is generally a nice cool place that does not freeze. The only downside I have discovered is that spiders quickly populate the rats nest of Ethernet cables!

    About the only fix I have found is an ostrich feather duster. (the vac is difficult to move around in the space I have)

    I agree with Dave, a cabled link to your wifi router may be required as there are often too many walls blocking signals.

    #61388
    Participant
    Dave Rice
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 9,540

    I have a small 6U cabinet and the spiders don’t seem to like it. To think of it I’ve never found any in any customers cabinets either. However the little b@st@rds love CCTV cameras.

    #61391
    Participant
    Dave Rice
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 9,540

    Can’t seem to edit the original post. The TP-Link wall units are 10/100 mbps. Not necessarily a deal breaker though. The Ubiquiti are gigabit. Both need a POE switch like this

    #61466
    Participant
    Tippon
    @tippon
    Forumite Points: 4,139

    OK, a kill two birds with one stone product: the wall port with Ethernet and Wifi Ubiquiti with a free cloud controller and set up link TP-Link EAP225-Wall Omada AC1200 free software but needs a host PC link Both only need a single Ethernet cable. I will be using the Ubiquiti in a new project for a mates physio clinic refurb, but the Omada dedicated controller is quite reasonable so…

    Thanks Dave :rose:

    Ouch! I always forget how much decent wifi kit costs :wacko:

    On the bright side, Ellen’s already okayed it, so I can’t get put in the doghouse, and I told her the price for the Ubiquiti kit, as this guy I know who knows lots about networks is always going on about how good they are :unsure:   :yahoo:

    The only downside is that because of the extra cost, the wifi kit will have to wait until next month. I’ve just got to decide now whether to run the cables now, or wait until next month and do everything in one go. I’ve got the old Talktalk router, so I can pop that into the garage and check the signal, but checking the other side of the house will be a bit awkward. The TP-Link powerline adapter has decided that it doesn’t want to work properly, and shuts the wifi off randomly. It should be an easy fix, but we’ll see.

    On the bright side, I’ve run the cable downstairs temporarily, and everything’s working as it should

    #61473
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 16,928

    Run the cables while you have the spare time and good weather.  Cabling always seems to take me 30% longer than I estimate. :unsure:

    #61478
    Participant
    Dave Rice
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 9,540

    Very true. Get Broadbandbuyer to set it up for you. If you add a device later they will add it to the existing site. After the free three years it’s a couple of quid a year.

    I can’t remember what they do about naming SSIDs but that’s easy to change on the controller anyway. Everything works on a site basis not a device basis, so when you change the site configuration the controller provisions the devices automatically with the new details. If a device is offline it gets changed next time it’s seen.

    The devices send loads of (near) real time data to the controller (as it’s text it’s tiny in size) and you can see exactly what the clients are experiencing. If there is a firmware update for a device it will let you know and you can roll out to the whole site with one click. I check every couple of weeks.

    If the controller loses sight of a device you will be emailed. If there are any glaring issues on a site the controller will flag them up and offer resolutions. It’s a different world.

    #61539
    Participant
    Tippon
    @tippon
    Forumite Points: 4,139

    Run the cables while you have the spare time and good weather. Cabling always seems to take me 30% longer than I estimate. :unsure:

    I think you jinxed me Ed. About 30 seconds after I read your post last night, there was a huge clap of thunder and my internet went down :wacko: :yahoo:

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