Have your cake and eat it.

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #30202

    keith with the teef
    Participant
    @thinktank

    Well, the dragon has been at it again.

    As per usual no cake for me.

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  • #30204

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 1,951

    Love it.

    Our wedding cake was made by a friend of the m-i-l so I know how much time and care goes into things like this. We still have the sugar flowers from the very top 32 years later.

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    #30206

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,923

    I had a hand in baking at least one of the layers and iced the whole thing, three layers, though no flowers or other fancies. The base was cooked in a large cooking pan which we later used as a jam maker come preserving pan, which just fitted into the oven; all that was 44 plus years ago in a land far away. The honeymoon was in Iran in January – before the present management took over thank goodness.

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    #30209

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,126

    Nice cake – very artistic.

    Richard, I have friends who recently did the Silk Road tour through Iran. They echoed Joanne Lumley’s recent ITV tour and said it was very friendly and nowhere near as fundamentalist as US/Israeli extremists would like to paint it. This was their second visit in the space of five years and they said there had been a major shift towards a more open culture.  Perhaps you should put it back on your travel list.

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    #30216

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,923

    It would be nice to go back to many places we once knew but health problems and the risk of tarnishing old memories is the major risk when much time has passed.

    Places have always changed, they look smaller, older, more drab, too spruced up or simply bulldozed – though hopefully not in the case of Persepolis. That was something of a vanity project for the old Shah so it could have been at risk during the years. It was an odd place back then, we always felt that even the stone walls watched us.

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    #30226

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,923

    After I had written the above and had a night in bed, I thought about recent experiences. Some 50 years ago I used to know parts of London and even drive about in that now so blighted place. A series of recent visits confirmed how alien the whole place now felt, roads that had once appeared familiar and usable, now felt hostile and unwelcoming. OK, we only ventured into more central parts by train so dealt with the issues on foot not in a vehicle, but the whole place felt foreign with only the road signs and some vehicle number plates suggesting it should have echoes of familiarity. The few people we encountered in the area of Euston Road and Tottenham Court Road made us feel like observers of a war documentary. The people shuffled along laden down with plastic bags apparently containing their worldly goods – and no these were not the homeless lodging in doorways of which we saw none. As far as we could make out they were all going about their daily business, dressed in their normal clothes and certainly not looking as though they had spent the night sleeping rough. There  were a few tourists, their American accents confirming they had no need of plastic bags of goods.

    I went through some old images of Washington DC taken back in the 1980s and thought that Google street view would be a great way to identify locations in some of the shots. Nothing is anything like what it was back then. Even quite close to the White House derelict and run down areas were often the other side of the street and though some reconstruction was then in evidence I was not prepared for the fact that whole areas of small buildings had been swept away and replaced by a range of new, faceless, multi-storey structures. Perhaps the areas were now safer, it was hard to tell from a screen shot, but it was, once more a place for new visitors to make their own new memories. It is another place for which I have lost any desire to return.

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    #30231

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,126

    Even quite close to the White House derelict and run down areas were often the other side of the street

    Very true Richard, but if you check out the areas that were b-dangerous 30+ years ago on the Washington Crime Map, they are still b-dangerous today. The changes have only affected the fabric and not the society.

    I do not know if attitudes have changed, but back in the days I lived in the US it was quite a normal experience to be pulled over by the cops and read the riot act for walking in an unsafe area!

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    #30232

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,923

    Yes Ed, we had the same in Philadelphia and in Florida, though it was not the cops but the hotel staff and a few other people when we said we had walked to a park, though in Florida the lack of any pedestrian provision was most obvious. It was a contrast to the places we had lived in, though not London. I used to do some antisocial hours work sometimes. Drive up to the gate, show your pass, wait for the gate to open just enough to slide through, then wait for the gate to shut before moving to park. Then watch to local displays of less than wonderful action from many floors up and hope to get out and home safely when all was done. Back then it felt easier to avoid trouble which tended to be a little more focused and less random – a bit like New Jersey appeared to be back then. Just do not mess with the people carrying cases of a certain size and shape and they will not mess with you.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by Richard.
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    #30234

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,126

    Yep – Philly was one of my stamping grounds and our daily entertainment was to sit in the car-share and lay bets on the numbers of murders that would be reported on the daily news. Even relatively safe places like Cherry Hill used to get its fair share of murders.

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    #30263

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,780

    Apart from a short stay in Galveston as a 17 yo deckhand and an excursion into Washington State in 1981 whilst on a Road Trip of British Columbia, I have not visited the US. However, I would expect that Spokane, Seattle and even Vancouver have similar problems to those described above.

    I did find the US citizens to be very hospitable at the time, very open and almost too willing to talk! “Oh gee, you guys are from England? Let me buy you a coffee/beer/whatever.” In BC the Canucks were more reserved, but just as hospitable. When my unit joined American forces in Germany on exercise, I discovered the true meaning of real racism, though. I found a good mate in a huge black guy who carried out the same work my fellow Air Techs did: his family accepted us into their home and we became good friends. One uncouth, obviously Southern white guy and his buddies accused me of being ” A N***** loving Limey SOB.”

    Nothing you can say or do to change the outlook of people like that, so I laughed in his face and walked away.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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