History field trip.

HOME Forums Other Stuff History field trip.

This topic contains 38 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 4 days, 7 hours ago.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #26669

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman

    This afternoon I was a bit bored so went to St Lythans

    My intention was to park up make my way to the gate, get a few photos and come back home. That didn’t happen. I saw the dolmen and had to get closer to it.

    It’s awesome. I’m so glad I made my very slow, careful way across the 50 odd meters or so of field but it was hard work and I’m absolutely broken now.

    Photo. 

    Another.

    Last one for now.

    My Instagram

    My YouTube

Spread the love
Viewing 18 replies - 21 through 38 (of 38 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #32562

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 2,266

    Watching Neil Oliver on BBC 4 tonight, all about the Mesolithic and the move to farming which brought about long barrows and other such monuments. The big one next week, Stonehenge. I used to go to the Free Festival every year until the authorities stopped it. That was a different sort of field trip 😉

    As I mentioned my Dad was right into stone circles etc. so I spent a lot of Sundays in Wiltshire as a kid. He used to go to Carnac every couple of years with his mate to do a bit more work on alignments. I must get there myself one day.

    0
    0
    #32569

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    I watched that too Dave. It always delights me that archaeologists are all so enthusiastic about their work. Nationality does not seem to matter; whether in China, Egypt, Britain or America, they are all the same. Passionate about the subject and always like a kid with a new toy when a new discovery is made.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

    0
    0
    #32614

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,559

    When I was a child I used to love running around in Caerleon and clambering all over the walls and other bits and pieces. Probably totally banned in today’s climate! However if anyone is in the Caerleon area it is well worth a visit as it has more Roman stuff than anywhere(?) else in the UK. Caerleon

    0
    0
    #32616

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 2,085

    Ed, you’re right about Caerleon, amazing stuff there.

    The amphitheatre is probably my favourite.

    My Instagram

    My YouTube

    0
    0
    #32624

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    My old village in Notts was surrounded by 3 hills, the highest was Church Hill and the second highest in the county. There was a beautiful view of Trent Vale from the church, or better still from the pub, “The Bird In Hand”, which is a local pub restaurant and has live entertainment. A few miles away by road, but closer as the Crow flies, is Newstead Abbey, which was never completely destroyed by Henry VIII and was home to Lord Byron.

    There were tunnels from St. Marys Church in Blidworth, dug by the Abbey monks, which go all the way to the Abbey and were used to smuggle out much of the Abbey valuables when Henry’s vandals came calling. It is said that they found the Abbey in such a poor state that they did not have the heart to do much damage. One of my boyhood mates and myself decided to test out the tunnels, despite warnings that they were dangerous. We took candles and counted our steps: got to over 700 before the candles began to die, so came back – obviously due to the Black Damp that our dads had told us happened underground, they were both miners. ‘Black Damp’ is of course CO² and we would have been very foolish to have carried on further into the tunnels.

    AFAIK those tunnels, or their remains, are still there. Some idiot developer decided to build an apartment block over them, next to the church, to provide Rooms With Views. Despite everyone advising them that the ground would not take the weight, they built. Now the apartments are all cracked and leaning walls. Last I heard, the developer and builder were being sued. together with the Council Building Inspectors who passed it.

    If anyone here is ever in the area, the church is worth a visit. It was a place of worship in Celtic and later Saxon times and that part of the village is called ” ‘owd village” by locals. It was old when the Domesday Book was put together, old when the Saxons came. And the Bird In Hand pub does a good meal. (Known locally as  ‘Bod.”)

    Check out the pub, local history and views:

    http://tinyurl.com/y9btmawm

     

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

    0
    0
    #33077

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 2,085

    Today’s field trip was a failure, I couldn’t find either of the sites I was looking for but I’m 90% certain I was parked in a layby  directly opposite one of them, busy B road and a high hedge ruled investigating further out.

    On the up side I did have about 90 minutes enjoying the roads and views of Monmouthshire. Great drivers roads, some like roller-coasters. Exactly what my Swift excels at. No photo opportunities sadly but that’s not the end of the world.

    A great way to spend a few hours this morning.

    My Instagram

    My YouTube

    0
    0
    #33078

    Boris
    Moderator
    @boris
    Forumite Points: 890

    I couldn’t find either of the sites I was looking for but I’m 90% certain I was parked in a layby directly opposite one of them, busy B road and a high hedge ruled investigating further out.

    Where were you aiming to go ?

    Never trust an atom - they make up everything !

    0
    0
    #33079

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 2,085

    Gaer Llwyd and Trellech

    Almost certain that it was the stones at Trellech I was parked across the road from, layby big enough for maybe 3 cars but the first half was very broken and bumpy.

    My Instagram

    My YouTube

    0
    0
    #33081

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,559

    While you are there see if anyone knows where the Trellech Treacle Mines are situated! (They are somewhere near the stones.)

    The area is on the edge of the Monmouthshire Coal Fields, and the ‘mines’ are apparently a natural molasses seep formed when coal precursors are ‘cooked’ underground, but my old Geology teacher could never find them.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Ed P.
    0
    0
    #34669

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 2,085

    Today I finally made it to Tinkinswood Burial Chamber.

    The ‘walk’ across the field and back nearly killed me but it was worth it. Truly amazing place.

    The approach  

    From the side

    360 photo

    I have many more photos but for some reason it’s really difficult to post links today.

    I’ll sort something out for the others.

    My Instagram

    My YouTube

    1
    0
    #34670

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 2,085

    More photos.

    My Instagram

    My YouTube

    1
    0
    #34672

    Les.
    Participant
    @oldles
    Forumite Points: 512

    This is the first time I have seen this thread, and one thing that caught my eye was Eds “Treacle mines”.

    Here in the Isle of Man, there are frequent references to the Treacle mines, and I always assumed this was a Manx version of Ken Dodd’s famous “Butty Mines”. I know roughly the location of the Treacle Mines, now I just need to find if they are/were a hoax, or a reality. I will ring my (Manx) pal in a few minutes.

    Les.

    0
    0
    #34842

    Les.
    Participant
    @oldles
    Forumite Points: 512

    I was going to post this in Bob’s archeology thread, but I can’t find it.

    Anyway, this is for you bob. This morning as we went shopping, R4 had part 5 of “The Fens”.

    It started on Monday (09:45) and continued on subsequent days until today. You WILL want to listen from part 1 on BBC Sounds.

    Les.

    0
    0
    #34849

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    Thanks Les, I’ll catch that on iPlayer.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

    0
    0
    #34878

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 2,266

    Talking to some Americans after our guided tour of the Basilica and Doge’s Palace in Venice. They were interested in going to London next year and they wondered if there was anything as old there?

    We had an interesting chat 😊 and didn’t even need to get around to Stonehenge, Westminster Abbey was enough. I explained London was London and not the UK and they were amazed to learn that even though we’re only 100 miles away, we go on holiday there too. Also explained that Scotland was quite a way away and probably warranted a trip of it’s own.

    0
    0
    #34879

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 3,559

    If they just want ‘old’ tell your Yank friends to go to the Mithrean Temple near London Wall. link 

    Of course there is The Tower, Crown Jewels etc dating from a thousand or so years later. Unlike the US, the whole of the UK is littered with old stuff (and old mentalities!). As Yanks they may even be interested in Jeremy Bentham the philosopher who laid the foundations for the US constitution. He was however a bit of an ego centric as he had himself stuffed and put on display at my old college. The wiki says he is on public display, but I’m not so sure of that as the louts at Imperial kept stealing his head!

    They can also go to the British Museum where there is a load of old stuff we looted from around the world. Imo it is not as good as the Berlin equivalent but still pretty good.

    London has lots of good museums, but imo one that should not be overlooked is the Welcome Collection.  They often have presentations that are of interest to teenagers – one recent one was on the Psychology of Magic (misdirection, expecting to see things which are not there, optical illusions etc.)

    • This reply was modified 4 days, 16 hours ago by Ed P.
    0
    0
    #34886

    JayCeeDee
    Participant
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 1,295

    Talking to some Americans after our guided tour of the Basilica and Doge’s Palace in Venice. They were interested in going to London next year and they wondered if there was anything as old there?

    The wife likes to tour historic places and when we were in Florida the Tourist Offices all made a big thing about St. Augustine.

    We drove down there for a day trip and it was a real let down!! She said that we’d driven through older, historic places on the way to Cornwall or the New Forest or East Anglia, in fact you could drive 50 miles in any direction from just about anywhere in the UK and you’d find one.

    0
    0
    #34892

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    Told this here before I think. At around 10 years old, my mate and I were up to no good playing in the churchyard on top of Church Hill in my old village, second highest spot in the county. Two young Americans showed up, festooned with cameras, and asked us where Will Scarlet’s grave was, having been directed here by some wag in Nottingham Castle. Now Will Scarlett was actually Will Scadluck or Scadlook, there were (almost illegible) Parish records for him living and dying in the village during the 12th Century. That was of course supposedly the Robin Hood era and Will was locally known as one of Rob’s Merry Men. If you think about the 12th century, consider that grave stones were made locally of soft sandstone and very few burials of peasants such as Will Whatever actually had headstones, it is fairly certain that no trace of Will’s burial is possible.

    However, that did not prevent two quick-thinking lads from immediately pointing to a sandstone slab with traces of totally illegible lettering incised upon it. This was one of many such slabs which had been rescued over the centuries, and artfully erected in the late 19th century, to form a very attractive border. The colonials requested photos of ourselves either side of the stone and we consented. They gave us a FIVER! EACH! Think about that: in 1955 or so, two 10 year old Nottinghamshire urchins were given Five Pounds for a complete historical fabrication.

    I wonder from time to time, on what American mantelpiece resides that picture, and how many times the story has been told. By the credulous, to the credulous. We felt no shame! I think we managed to spend just a little of that £5 before our dads got wind of it, probably from a local sweet shop proprietor who changed our notes. At that time, I don’t think our miner dads earned £5 for 5 shifts on the coalface. I do know that both dads took the p*** out of us about that for some time in later years.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

    1
    0
Viewing 18 replies - 21 through 38 (of 38 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Spread the love