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I in hospital

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This topic contains 60 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 1 year, 1 month ago.

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  • #26312

    johnbarry
    Participant
    @johnbarry

    A bit bored sitting on the bed in hospitahospitalq after having heart attack

    It's said to be easy when you know how. If you don't know how, then you need the help of forumites.

    Cheers
    John

Viewing 20 replies - 21 through 40 (of 60 total)
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  • #26357

    D-Dan
    Participant
    @d-dan
    Forumite Points: 1,529

    I can’t offer any further advice, my heart is about the only thing that works well. What I can do is send you my best wishes and hopes for a speedy recovery.

    Ryzen 7 1800X, 16 GB, 6 (yes - 6) HDs inc 2 SSDs, 4 RPi 3Bs + 1 RPi 4B - one as an NFS server with two more drives, PiHole (shut yours), Plex server, cloud server, and other random Pi stuff. Nice CoolerMaster case, NV GTX 1060 6GB, and a whopping 32" AOC 1440P monitor.

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    #26362

    johnbarry
    Participant
    @johnbarry
    Forumite Points: 2,921

    Thanks all I got parcel dave thanks I cant be doing with this mobile net I tried to add emotion and the screen danced back and forth flashind p p

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    It's said to be easy when you know how. If you don't know how, then you need the help of forumites.

    Cheers
    John

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    #26368

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    Blimey John you don’t do anything by halves mate! Hope you get well soon, although I know it may be a long process, being bored is OK providing your body is getting the rest it needs. As with D-Dan, my heart is one of the few bits still doing alright, thanks to 3 daily walks  lurches around the 3 blocks here. I vary that by going clockwise one day, anti-clockwise the next, lol. SWMBO and I also get down to the beach and stagger through soft sand a bit, then off to our favourite cafe for a nice cream scone*. Yes, I know, cholesterol, but we are both OK there as we have regular checks and I take Pravastatin.

    *The walks are punishment, the scones are rewards.??

    Keep in touch only when you can John, we are all rooting for you. Best of British, Bob.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #26373

    Mark Turner
    Participant
    @turner74
    Forumite Points: 539

    Take it easy John and get well soon

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    #26387

    johnbarry
    Participant
    @johnbarry
    Forumite Points: 2,921

    Thanks easy is now my middle name I should be home later today with plenty of chilling.

    It's said to be easy when you know how. If you don't know how, then you need the help of forumites.

    Cheers
    John

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    #26389

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    Time to do as you’re told young man ?

    As I mentioned before the after care I’ve had, especially immediately afterwards, has been brilliant. The outpatient cardiac nurses really know their stuff and will talk through everything with you. You’ll get tons of leaflets too, and tablets. I take 4, aspirin, beta blocker, water tablet (I can pee for England) and a statin. I have been on a super water tablet too when I had some fluid on the lungs trouble (the part of my heart that got damaged deals with the lungs).

    I only have annual checkups now, basically blood tests, but the hospital keep a separate watch on the fluid on the lungs issue. Again this is down to an annual visit and for the last 2 years it’s been fine. I have had no problems getting travel insurance (for Europe) and it wasn’t expensive.

    Everything in moderation is now the rule. I haven’t given up alcohol or other treats but no longer have them hanging around in quantity. I can honestly say they’re not missed day to day but sometimes you need a treat ? I have been lax at exercise, my other disabilities don’t help, it’s easy to sit there if you have nothing planned. On that score I’m out for a walk in a mo.

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    #26394

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 7,622

    Walking is the best exercise, as the leg muscles actually do part of the hearts function in pumping the blood around. (Not jogging or running on hard surfaces unless you want your knees/hips to disintegrate). Swimming is even better. But if you cannot do those then the post-cardiac nurses will advise you on upper body exercises that do a good job.

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    #26396

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,303

    Dave, you might want to delay the walk for a few more minutes and do wrap up nice and warm before you go. I have just done a whisker under 3 miles with daughter’s dogs and it was blooming chilly with frost on the grass and a very chill air, the dogs loved it, but my hands did not. A neighbour had a similar experience to you over aftercare he was always out walking briskly about the area after his initial recovery period. he has since moved to a new location because of dealing with aged parents but he used to say how he was monitored for all the vital aspects of his care with plans and guidance sheets to keep him right.

    Disabilities really do not help with exercise, do you think that they played any part in your heart trouble? or is there no clear reason for your heart attack? At least you now have in mind to try to keep moderation as a guide and watchword. I have never had any hint of heart trouble, but I know that moderation would be wise to adopt. Though I should couple that to ‘balance’ and pacing myself in all things that I do, think, or say. If you can exert leverage on a situation do so, if you cannot; then do not fret, never fret rant or rave, walk away and deal with something you can fix. It served by father well for the last 45 years of his life until he died at 93. The last few years he lived with a monster aneurysm which with over excitement could have burst at any moment. His surgeon never got to operate father left it too late, but urged me to get checked out, I did and was given the all clear, that condition can be genetic.

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    #26398

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,303

    Walking is the best exercise, as the leg muscles actually do part of the hearts function in pumping the blood around. (Not jogging or running on hard surfaces unless you want your knees/hips to disintegrate). Swimming is even better. But if you cannot do those then the post-cardiac nurses will advise you on upper body exercises that do a good job.

    No argument to that. I was told of the venous pump back in the 1960s when I had a knee operation, ‘so get moving!’. The nurses said something like 40% of the circulation effort can come from the legs. If you have to walk (not run or jog) on firm surfaces, wear suitable footwear. There are many supportive shoes with cushioned soles that work. Avoid the fashion statement junk. My knees, ankle and spine hate anything the lacks good support and cushioning A well conditioned foot should also help with the impact management for walking, running or jogging require perfect technique and training. As a lousy swimmer I find making time for regular swimming too challenging. I was offered hydrotherapy after one spinal round, the the physio told me that the prescribed exercises plus walking including to and from the hospital already put me ahead of most patients even after their hydropool sessions. They were, on average younger than me.

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    #26401

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    It was a bit chilly to start with, but that’s what coat, hat and gloves are for ? Hat and gloves came off half way through.  I wandered down to and around 40 acres park. Its a bit of land next to the south wales railway line that used to flood every winter when I was a kid. Due to the massive building projects in the area the worst of the drainage was sorted but I don’t think it can ever be built on. Good news for us. It’s the same a mile up the Stoke Brook in the middle of the concrete jungle of Bradley Stoke. There has to be somewhere for all that run off to go.

    Accidentally did 3 miles as it was so nice out; diverted to Parkway Station to pick up my train tickets to London next Tuesday – to the Synology 2019 do. One issue I have is the venous pump back, I have no right knee joint. This can lead to blood pooling around my ankle but this doesn’t happen so much since I had the joint replaced (arthritis). The circulation was tested thoroughly before the ankle operation could go ahead and deemed acceptable.

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    #26439

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,303

    About 65 years ago I lived a little to the south of there and had several uncles who worked for Bristol Aeroplane Company at Filton, but have left the area in the early 1950s even my memory of Fishponds, the Oldbury Court Estate, etc. is now somewhat faded, but I remember the walks in the area. Traffic was much reduced compared with now so far safer and easier on the lungs, even when not out in the country. The rail wine still worked via the local station to Bath, I understand it is now just a walkway after the Rail Closures of the 1960s.

    After me early morning frost cruncher walks with the dogs yesterday I had a warmer march round one of the more specialist hospitals with my wife to learn more about her planned surgery, so added another far slower half mile or so to my days total. An hour’s drive there and another hour back, half way across the adjacent county for a 20 minute consultation. My wife was happy with what she gained, but, the effects of her latest and hopefully final round of chemo were very clear, she is struggling to eat and walking is not fun. So those walks round the large hospital were not fun. Still the plastics unit staff were pretty upbeat and my wife stands to loose a major scar though gain a number of hopefully less obvious ones during the process.

    I brought the afternoon dog walks forward so they were shirt sleeve affairs and far more enjoyable for that though they took my daily walking distance well past 6 miles. The effects on such as blood pressure was far less obvious though it is now more consistently within the acceptable range.

    Sorry that your knee is locked, has the joint actually been removed or is it simply not flexing at all. While a lot of things can now be done with joints that were once impossible. I could understand that fixing them, or trying to fix your now now is probably a gamble you would probably not wish to undertake, even if it was considered possible. I was lucky, neither my right knee nor left ankle reached the problem level yours attained.

    Today’s morning dog walk has been delayed to attend to other issues which allows the worst of the frost to clear. Hopefully it will be a more comfortable experience.

    On a different subject, my 30 metre flat patch cable is now currently part of my spares chest, where it may well remain for sometime until it finds a useful home, if ever.

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    #26444

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    The joint is totally gone, the result of knee hitting railing at 40+mph They squared off the ends of what was left of the condyles (not much) and joined the two together, so it’s now one bone from hip to ankle.

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    #26445

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,303

    ouch, that sounds seriously painful, then and on an ongoing basis. Walking must be a serious challenge, I applaud you for being able to walk and the extent to which you achieve walking.

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    #26453

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    Dave I had no idea of the disabilities, pain and struggle you face every day. To keep walking whilst every step is giving you hell, is something I have also learned to do, although I cannot imagine what using that leg must be like. I wish you the continued determination to keep battling on. That keeps the heart and lungs going, which is why I force myself out 3 times daily to lurch around the 3 blocks in ever-decreasing circles, lol.

    A local villager asked me a few years ago, why I did not use a mobility scooter like his. My answer was that, although he is 16 years my junior and did not have my chequered medical history, I would probably outlive him, which sadly happened: he died of a heart attack, getting off his scooter to buy his usual crisps, pies, ice cream and junk food. He had been quite capable of walking until he put on so much weight that his legs could no longer support him.

    I damaged my left knee by playing football on a rough pitch in Füssen, Bavaria against a Bündeswehr Alpine team. I was “treated” in a Bavarian hospital by nuns – ice packs, ice baths, repugnant poultices, until I begged my C.O. use his connections and Casevac me back to base on the undercarriage of a Sioux AAC helicopter, to BMH Rinteln. I was never the same player after that, but the knee appeared to recover and I could still run, and given a choice between running and football, I would have taken running any day. I loved it, it gave me a sort of freedom in my head, hard to explain. I won quite a few races, but that was not was it was all about for me. Out in Civvy Street, the knee became worse, until a Mansfield hospital had a look and recommended an Arthroscopy. A mix-up in that resulted in them removing most of the remaining cartilage, because “We thought you were in for a new knee, but you are too young.” My reply to that you may imagine: I have walked on that knee in pain for many years, so I understand what bone-on-bone feels like.

    What a Battered Bunch we Forumites are!

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #26455

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    The knee itself has never been painful, there is no joint to be painful. However it’s nearly 3″ shorter (it has to be a bit shorter to walk) so my body is lopsided. You would think all the strain is on the good side, after all my left knee has to do the work of two when standing up etc. however that’s not the case.

    More weight goes down the right side of my body plus my spine bends to compensate for the difference in length. That has caused my right ankle to wear out, no longer painful since it’s been replaced though. But all the joints on the right hand side, including my shoulder (seems weird but makes sense) are more worn than the left. I get bad backs because of the spine bending but it’s rare it spasms so much I can’t move.

    My left knee is now very painful when standing up or sitting down and perversely at rest including at night in bed. It’s fine standing and walking, but the residual soreness from standing up now lasts a long while. It’s not arthritis, I’ve seen the x-rays. They don’t know what it is, they just say it’s “over strained”, but to me it seems like something is causing inflammation between the knee joint and the knee cap and that is hitting a nerve. There is no discernible swelling but it wouldn’t need much in that small gap. I can’t cope with long car rides, like going to Cornwall, very well any more as I can’t move my left knee much. Stairs are a nightmare, especially going down them in crowded public places like the tube. I get the Mrs to go behind me to run interference ?

    All this combined has me back on Tramadol 3 times a day which I hate. It contributes to the “I can’t be bothered” mentality.

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    #26456

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    Wow that is a lot of crosses to bear daily, Dave. Stairs are what forced us into a bungalow from a 3-bed house. I can manage going up with stops, but going down is a problem as the left knee joint separates and when it comes back together on the next step down, I really know about it! Today I had a Louth hospital Dietician appointment at 12:30, then my Cycle 5 Grimsby Chemo session at 2:30. The Louth appointment would have been all good but for the fact that the lift was cream-crackered and the room was 3 floors up.

    The Dietician appointment was not what I was expecting: I anticipated being told lots of stuff I should not eat, but after reviewing my diet and taking my weight and height, the very pleasant and obviously experienced lady said I was doing fine. BMI is well within limits, weight has stabilised around 71 KG and even the occasional bag of crisps is fine. As I am not allowed the Activia yoghurt I like (being probiotic, interferes with Chemo) I was given the welcome news that I can have ice cream instead. What a nice lady!

    The Chemo was as it usually is except that the later appointment introduced me to a new collection of fellow patients, made new friends but did not miss the Moaner from the earlier sessions. Apparently I am making good progress.

    I find that driving, which I have always enjoyed, is more comfortable for me than sitting at home. Consequently I get the iX20 out at any opportunity and combine it with a walk somewhere different. It’s having to enter and leave the car which is not a comfy process!

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #26457

    Tippon
    Keymaster
    @tippon
    Forumite Points: 2,663

    All this combined has me back on Tramadol 3 times a day which I hate. It contributes to the “I can’t be bothered” mentality.

    I know that feeling well Dave, and I don’t envy you. You get to thinking that because everything is so much more of an effort, you may as well stay where you are and not deal with it. I’ve found that forcing myself to do something, even something small, helps. e.g. I take Alice to nursery three times a week, so I’ll buy an all day bus ticket and go into town for a coffee instead of going to the nearest shop, or I’ll walk along the bus route with her and catch the bus the rest of the way if I get stuck.

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    #26470

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 7,622

    But all the joints on the right hand side, including my shoulder (seems weird but makes sense) are more worn than the left. I get bad backs because of the spine bending but it’s rare it spasms so much I can’t move.

    A Mate of my no.1 son is a podiatrist (specialises in stance, gait etc plus of course sports medicine), once commented to me ‘Bloody Doctors, they never look at the whole body. Purpose built footwear would save the NHS a fortune in treating lower back pain and hip replacements’

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    #26472

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    I have a shoe with a raise in it, but it took >20 years to get one! The problem is that the leg that doesn’t bend has to be shorter to walk so I will always be lopsided. The shoe makes that a bit better and doesn’t look like a Frankenstein job, you couldn’t tell at a normal glance (I know how Tom Cruise feels now ? ).

    You only get one pair and not all shoes can be adapted, so I decided that my “formal” shoe will be the one. It’s a Doc Martin clone and they weren’t sure it would be suitable, but they managed it (the raise is basically a wedge in the heel). There is no way my safety shoes could be adapted, nor anything you would wear about the house. So it’s a bit of a waste of time. My every day non work shoes are Clarks Active Air ones, that sort of sole makes a difference.

    It’s just as well my spine bends a bit more than it should, try putting your shoes on and doing up the laces without bending your leg. I can touch my toes no problem.

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    #26473

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 5,727

    . It’s not arthritis, I’ve seen the x-rays. They don’t know what it is, they just say it’s “over strained”, but to me it seems like something is causing inflammation between the knee joint and the knee cap and that is hitting a nerve..

    I have something similar in my joints, mostly hands, back , shoulder and wrists. Ankles are joining in more often as is my left knee and hip. They have no idea what it is so it’s been labelled as Chronic Pain Syndrome.

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