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New Electric Vehicles only from 2030

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    Topic
  • #63633
    Participant
    PlaneMan
    @planeman

    So Boris has done it, no new petrol or diesel cars or vans in the UK from 2030.

    Generally I think it’s a good idea but only 10 years to sort out the infrastructure is, IMO, nowhere near enough. Look at the state of broadband in rural areas still.

    The cost needs to come down and the range needs to go up. A little reported fact is at motorway speeds range drops of a cliff on most EVs.  Also cold weather can have a big impact on range.

    For someone like me with no drive at home and needs to use disabled parking charging at the supermarket/shopping centre isn’t viable. At the moment I’ve only seen chargers in the further away areas of car parks and they are all  slow chargers.  Something like a Renault Zoe would take 8 hours to charge, if not more.

    There are no super fast chargers anywhere near me and only a couple of ‘rapid’ ones which are normally in use as they are at car dealerships.

    Then there’s the cost. The initial price is so much more than a conventional car but the maintenance is almost nothing and if you can charge at home/work for cheap ‘fuel’ is much, much cheaper.

    If you lease then the monthly cost can be offset by the saving on fuel. If you buy outright, like me, then the extra cost is a huge factor, I’d need to almost double what I paid for my current car to get a lightly used E 208 which is the closest pure electric car to mine, and the range is a bit rubbish, about 155 miles in the real world or 100 at any decent speed. That wouldn’t get me to Bristol Airport and back unless I did 50 mph all the way and then it would be way to close a call.

     

     

Viewing 7 replies - 21 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #64038
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 16,928

    A couple of Aussie states have brought in an annual mileage-based electric car tax that wipes out any incentive to get one. The Greenies are up in arms about it. Pretty dumb really, they should have wiped out the petrol duty and made the mileage charge universal, then they could have kept some sort of apparent incentive.

    #64045
    Participant
    Dave Rice
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 9,540

    Well there’ll be a massive tax black hole to fill and our current method of taxation is based on usage. The more petrol you buy the more tax you pay. Seems fair enough to me.

    If they provide some sort of incentive, as they did with unleaded, as soon as the balance tips they will remove the incentive anyway.

    The move to electric vehicles is to save the planet not make travelling cheaper.

    #64048
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 16,928

    If we really want to cool the earth’s climate and supposedly save the planet, we should encourage the burning of high sulfur fuels in ocean going ships, not ban it as is currently the case. (Transatlantic air travel is pretty good too)

    There is indisputable scientific evidence from the CERN CLOUD experiment that sulfuric acid is an essential prerequisite to the formation of clouds over the ocean, and strong scientific evidence that such clouds act as a sunscreen so cooling the planet.

    Incidentally there is strong geological evidence that high levels of CO2 are correlated with more plant/animal life on the planet, so I’m not convinced about any link between saving the planet and reducing CO2. (cows farting are much worse!)

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Ed P.
    #64305
    Participant
    keith with the teef
    @thinktank
    Forumite Points: 2,965

    Current thinking is that because making the batteries is so resorce hungry its like have 50000 on the clock before its left the show room.

    #64308
    Participant
    Wheels-Of-Fire
    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 6,312

    If your’e  not using 100% carbon free generation then there is the inefficiency of the whole thing to think about too.

    If you burn fuel to make mechanical energy it is far from 100% efficient but at least if you burn the fuel in your car you can use that energy to drive the wheels directly.

    For an electric vehicle you have to use mechanical energy to drive a generator which is far from 100% efficient.

    Then you must send the electricity over a distribution network, which is less than 100% efficient.

    Then you must use a charger to get the right Voltage/Current to charge your battery, which is not 100% efficient.

    Then you must actually charge the battery, which is not 100% efficient.

    Then you must release the electricity from the battery and regulate it, which is not 100% efficient.

    And finally you must use a less than 100% efficient electric motor to produce mechanical power to drive the wheels.

    All in all, its a wonder there is enough power left to actually go anywhere 😆

    #64310
    Participant
    Dave Rice
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 9,540

    Not true.

    “EVs convert over 77 per cent of the electrical energy from the grid to power at the wheels. Conventional gasoline vehicles only convert about 12 per cent – 30 per cent of the energy stored in gasoline to power at the wheels,” according to the US Department of Energy”.

    If you’re going to include distribution then you must include the energy to get the stuff out of the ground, refined, transported, pumped etc.

    #64314
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 16,928

    I agree it isn’t as ‘green’ as many think, but electric cars have one huge advantage. They totally diminish the dangerous power that the Middle East had over the political thinking of the West, and it shafts the Scots Nats at the same time! :yahoo:

Viewing 7 replies - 21 through 27 (of 27 total)
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