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This topic contains 44 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Drezha 5 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #14365

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman

    I found a glitch on the 02 site for a OnePlus 5T 128 GB, 8GB RAM for £430, should be £499. 2% TopCashback possible as well. PAYG but they are unlocked with no network branding, allegedly.

    Order has gone through and been confirmed.

    If it’s honored is another thing.

    Was about to post it here and on HUKD but it’s been fixed.

    Wish me luck! Or not. 😁

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Viewing 20 replies - 21 through 40 (of 44 total)
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  • #16023

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 1,541

    I’ll admit, contactless cards worry me. A trawl around the ChaosComputing site (a legitimate bunch of EU white hats) reveals that all banks have less than stellar security on their contactless cards and they are vulnerable to electronic pick-pocketing.  If such pick-pockets kept amounts small e.g. coffee cup size, then it would be very difficult to spot and very difficult for banks to prove or disprove if the perpetrator had the foresight to set themselves up as some form of street vendor. For that reason I keep my bonk&pay cards in a Faraday caged wallet as I’d anticipate some bank push-back if I disputed more than one or two such payments.

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    #16024

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    We all need to remember that we are all different and have different needs, some of us more niche needs, but just because we don’t see the benefits for us, doesn’t mean there isn’t a need for such things.

    Sometimes I’ll see something and scratch my head why it exsists as a product of service. But it wouldn’t be a ‘thing’ if there wasn’t a market for it.

    Us as geeks should understand this. We are usually at the front of the bandwagon, while everyone else points fingers, but eventually catch up.

    Insurance is one of the biggest cons going. I find changing every year is a must. Cars for instance sell at a loss, or close to, for year one, with the hope your to lazy to switch or notice they pumped you the price by a third for the second year. Only once since I’ve been driving have i not have to change. It went up by about £20, but was still around about the cheapest. I could of save about a tenner, but for the sake of a tenner i cba.

    My dog insurance went up by almost 100% this year! I won’t be staying with john lewis next.

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    #16071

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    Be careful  if you change pet insurance if you have ever made a claim in the past. Any future claim can get classed as a pre-existing condition and get declined I have known of such things happen. Pet insurance is expensive, especially for the drugs, no prize for guessing some of the drivers and rises sharply as dogs age. We found that with our Labrador though to be fair he did generate a few chunky claims before the cancer got him. He used what might be termed my private stash of Tramadol for a while, then ate like only a Labrador can in the evening; during the night things went off and by six he was  to all intents gone, no sense of smell sight or responses. All of his useful brain activity was done, just heart and lungs kept on.

    You are completely correct that we all have very different needs, risk profiles and the markets are still quite poor in recognising these differences. I am consistent, I have no problem with legal things being available for those who want them, but I do not want to be forced to take, or shoulder unwanted risks and possibly pay for those I do not need or want. I very rarely have a bill small enough for wave pay because of lifestyle issues, its bigger shopping trips or nothing. I only use the non wave and pay credit card when grocery shopping, internet purchases use a different card, but wave a pay does not apply in that case.

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    #16072

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    I’ll admit, contactless cards worry me. A trawl around the ChaosComputing site (a legitimate bunch of EU white hats) reveals that all banks have less than stellar security on their contactless cards and they are vulnerable to electronic pick-pocketing. If such pick-pockets kept amounts small e.g. coffee cup size, then it would be very difficult to spot and very difficult for banks to prove or disprove if the perpetrator had the foresight to set themselves up as some form of street vendor. For that reason I keep my bonk&pay cards in a Faraday caged wallet as I’d anticipate some bank push-back if I disputed more than one or two such payments.

    I have also read such comments with even chip and pin not being totally secure in all situations.

    Some UK banks have been saying one thing about their contactless while not doing anything at all to control the risks. Lose a card, report the loss and it might still have been buying coffee for months. That is supposed to have been closed off  on several different dates. Hopefully it is now stopped. So it was with the wave x times before needing a PIN, that did not always apply, use it x-1 times rest it for a few days, the x counter reset and it could go off on the merry go round once more. It was all done in the interests of helping the customer experience.

    The Faraday cage idea has merit but I am rarely out and about so the effort may not be justified, – I hope.

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    #16088

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,649

    My shopping town is Louth, just 2½ miles down the road from my village, which has a twice-weekly mobile Post Office and a small shop run by volunteers. Louth has a plethora of charity shops and a lot of small shops. The only “chain” type shops are a small Morrisons, a Peacock’s, a small Argos and a Heron. We love our small shops in Louth, but they are having problems with the new law regarding bank cards. It is now illegal to make a charge upon card purchases and the 5p. plastic bag charge is set to be added to all shops soon. For a large shop or a shop which is part of a larger company, these laws will possibly mean a very small rise in product prices, if any. For a small shopkeeper, it could mean the difference between profit and loss, especially when High Street rents and rates are rising. I have therefore decided to make some shopping changes in town.

    *I will carry a bit more cash for small shop purchases, but only as necessary: there are several ATM’s in the town, convenient to main shopping areas.

    *I will carry at least one folded, collapsible shopping bag and avoid the plastic bag surcharge.

    I know that paying cash will affect the cashback on my contactless card, but that is a small price to pay for keeping local small shopkeepers in business. Some of them I have known for many years as friends, and have regular conversations with. There is a Market 3 times a week* and the Traders, all regulars of many years, obviously do not work with anything but cash. If everyone who shopped at small shops, followed the above previous two paragraphs, small shops stand a better chance of survival. When they’re gone, they’re gone and your High Street is full of the clones that every town and city has. This is a very true statement that describes the situation:

    (Quoting Steve) ” We all need to remember that we are all different and have different needs, some of us more niche needs, but just because we don’t see the benefits for us, doesn’t mean there isn’t a need for such things.

    That’s from a guy who grew up in a big city area and now lives in rural Wales. We don’t all live in big cities and towns and we all have different shopping needs, from different outlets.

    *Anyone considering a visit to Louth market, should make it a Wednesday. That’s the biggest and best market. Park in Eastgate Long Stay (On the right, left side is Shortstay)

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #16091

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 928

    I use Android Pay instead of my card for contactless, the card details used by Android Pay isn’t your actual card details, it’s a virtual set of information.

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    #16093

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    I use Android Pay instead of my card for contactless, the card details used by Android Pay isn’t your actual card details, it’s a virtual set of information.

    It takes  me too long to dig the mobile out of my inner pocket to ever use it for anything much, I would be driving down the road with chip and pin paid goods before the mobile was out of my pocket. Cash is just as easy for me as the card should the purchase be really small.

    As was said we all have different needs profiles, thank god we have choices for the moment.

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    #16116

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    I use android pay that much now i rarely take out my wallet. I do have the emergency card in my car, it was the fuel card but became the emergency card. I use it less and less. Especially since Tesco has an app with no purchase limit. Though hoping android pay can bypass the 30£ limit soon. It would be perfect then.

    I’m now down to taxis for cash, and that’s super rare. If im away from my village ill grab an uber. They are not in nor probably coming to my area. Back home the uber has pushed the black cabs and minicabs, to pick up their game. Unlike the taxis around my new home.

    Funny how you’ll, or at least me, refer to where i grew up as back home, even though I’ve lived here now as long as i did ‘back home’. I wonder if that will ever stop.

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    #16117

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    Bob regarding your smaller village high street shops. The sales they will miss out not having contactless/chip n pin, will eventually pit them out of business, before the small charge will. Even if it doesn’t look like it today for them, remind them their usual clientele are not going to be around forever, and their next wave of clientele will just walk on by if they know that place only excerpts cash.

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    #16129

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    I am not sure who uses cash in your village shops but could easily switch to other payment means, but in our case is it a wide mixture with small kids spending pocket money through to pensioners., are they all really going to go cashless for their postage stamps or penny chews? It might be that the 90% of these ‘small deal’ customers could be cut aside and the shop remain trading, but the main general shop is also the post office and a newsagent, a few people do still buy papers I am told though I have not done so for years. Near my daughter’s house a shop does a brisk trade in meter key recharging with credit-less customers putting a few pound cash on their key. Daughter’s house was repossessed from a bankrupt jobbing builder so had pre-pay meters when we started to recondition it to become habitable again. I charged up the keys with a previously unheard of payment to keep it heated over Christmas. The entire shop fell silent when I topped more than the five or ten pounds usually spent. The house was still unoccupied and it was £$%^&*() freezing and I knew the snow would make access difficult for a couple of days.

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    #16136

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    I send my kids the shop with my bank card, have done for years, we have a special one just for the local shop that the kids can grab if needed . The older ones have there own cards for pocket money.

    If under 16s was allowed tap n pay , my 9yo would have one already, but yes she gets cash, but refuses to spend it. So i have a sealed piggy bank with 4 years of £5 and 10s crammed into it. Were on about our 4th bank, as the mint keeps changing their cash!

    She still makes me gives her my card to buy sweets.

    Today’s pensioners, the majority, won’t go cashless, but I’d guess once they go, there will be hardly any cash buyers.

    The issue I have with this is a year on year the Bank of England will slowly reduce circulation until they get to a point where they can justify withdrawing cash altogether.

    There are many reasons why this is terrible. So really i should be so ‘all on om contactless ‘. However its just so convenient. Also i won’t shop in shops that charge for using a card, though that is being banned, and i won’t use an atm with a charge, i never have.

    We have a local spar shop that charges for cards, or did, so the only reason i go I’m it is to drop off parcels, as it’s a collect plus point.

    It may only be 25p, bit it isnt the point. I know of many that won’t go there because of it. I have no idea if they have changed, but it’s now long tainted. And only still open cos its next to the high school. Though now school is cash free, kids don’t have their dinner money to spend on sweets like they did prior.

    School dinners, is just set on a direct debit, that goes into the pupils food/trip/etc account and the kids have a contactless card that registers them in school and classes, and pays for lunch and we pay trips too via the same account.

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    #16141

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    Steve, I have no doubt about that for you and others who do have a card or cards, but for those who do not even have bank accounts or only have accounts with few if any options it is going to be a challenge.

    Add in the surcharges which you rightly say the rest of us are not prepared to pay and the charge card pudding mess gets worse in many areas. Those areas with say 15~20 betting shops and no free ATM are likely to get a ‘noticeable’ increase in anti social activities in the area.

    I believe you can get money from a Post Office under some circumstances, if there is one anywhere near to the customer’s location.

    However, none of this solves the issue of those who having been made bankrupt for example who face challenges getting any financial tools. Paying a ‘service charge’ on a tiny purchase would be a non starter if it doubled or more the cost you would pay. I admit to being out of touch with card issuers rules these days, maybe children can get them very young, I would not trust the cards to have anything much in the way of control options.

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    #16151

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,649

    The more I have read of replies here, the more I realise that my area is different to most. Louth does have several smaller shops which take cards without charging, but these are the “Exclusive” type of Country Clothing (hunting & shooting Set) or fashionable clothing at daft prices for people who don’t realise how daft they look wearing it. There are also quite a few Antique shops of long-standing and antique buyers come from miles away to buy. There are a lot of entertainments people in the area: Barbara Dickson, Jim Broadbent and Will Young, plus others I forget. There is money in the area, as usual concentrated in the hands of a few. The Town Council has made a decision to make Louth even more of a “Food Town” and Rates discounts are given to those who open eating places. As a result we have more Tea Rooms, cafes and restaurants than can possibly make money. On Wednesday market days, we locals try to stay away from Louth. The narrow Georgian streets and narrow pavements are full of visitors and Rubber Neckers standing up to 6 deep and having conversations. Good for the local economy, bad for locals trying to get around.

    The Exclusives, antiques and fashionable shops take cards, but the local people are used to dealing with cash in the small shops. I can’t see that changing very quickly. Ludensians (Louth folk) and East Lindsey people in general, are resistant to change.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #16159

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    To be fair to the village we also have a range of shops, well more like a top and bottom of shops. there are still two banks and one building Society, though I have no connection to any of them. We also have a number of antique shops and yes they, the hairdressers and several other shops do take cards. It is just that some cohorts of users are, how can I say this tactfully small money users and some even in the village are cash poor, though if they own their house possibly asset rich. There are clearly some for whom money does not grow on trees and possibly does not grow at all, though we have so far been spared the sight and difficulty of the destitute on the street.

    You can easily spend the wrong side of £1,000 and more on a wedding dress and close to that on ladies frocks in some places, or £8 in a second hand clothes charity shop. The dress was probably sold originally in the pricey location. These example;es show the range of user demand profiles and financial acumen that need to be covered – some people might equally need only a postage stamp for 50~60 pence. The upmarket foodie place shut down suddenly a few months ago in the middle of a marketing drive. No one really knows why, though speculation suggests it was a combination of commercial rent and business rates along with local wage costs. The remaining food points are at the lower price end, say about £5 per plate. I don’t know if they take cards in any form – though I do know the car park with the slowest ticket machines in the world will take card payments. The first half hour is free and you can have an hour for 20 pence which makes card payments slightly odd.

    In short it is a very mixed place, heterogeneous some might say which is why I suspect that evolutionary change may come slowly. One of the busiest trade activities is chemist shops we have two within fifty yards of each other and both are busy.

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    #16162

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,649

    Village Richard? Range of shops? TWO banks, a building society, antiques shops, hairdressers? Blimey, that’s a town on its way to becoming a city, compared to Lincolnshire villages.😉😁 From Louth to Mablethorpe (15 miles) through 3 villages, there are 3 pubs and no Post Offices, no shops except for the volunteer-manned (womanned?) shop in ours.

    I suspect that our village is on its way to becoming a commuter village. There is a Community Centre, with modern hall, a large sports ground which has regular fetes and car boots in warmer months. Unfortunately most of the Commitee andvolunteer helpers, are ageing and very few young people are coming forward to join them. Suddenly, in the last two months of 2017, two small developments have been started, to join the two large Executive Homes built at the edge of the village in early 2017. Hopefully there is new blood coming in and we need it, although some of the older villagers are not best pleased. Ironically, most of the anti’s are incomers themselves. One couple were complaining to me about ‘incomers’ when I said “But you weren’t born here.”    –    “No and neither were you!”    –    “No, but I had been a resident for 11 years when you moved in!”

    End of conversation.😆😄

    You can please some of the people, some of the time…

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #16163

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    Yes Bob, it claims to be a town with a town council but to be honest the main equivalent to a high street is about 140 yards long is medieval narrow and has almost all of the shops with several vacant and others regularly turned over. the main antiques centre is down by the railway station in what used to be the buildings forming parts of the malting industry. The small antiques shops are pretty snooty and do not last long. We used to have a LLoyds bank, very useful but it became a forced TSB, thank you EU. As a Lloyds Bank, it was useful but as a TSB it is about as useful as nipples on a fish. There is also a Barclays bank, not hugely useful either. The building society is essentially in the front room of one of the elderly houses, I’m not sure but it could be 16th or 17th century. The church had substantial associations with Henry the 8th and the surrounding estates were owned by various involved with the throne and several Royal wills. One was given to one of his wives, I cannot be bothered to look up which after a few glasses of wine, the universal ‘unwinder’. Beckham had one of the larger houses for a while, it was once a council building said to have been for wayward children. We have lived here almost 26 years, which makes is new comers, but by heck the place has changed in that time. We do have a couple of social necessities, a funeral director and a fire station, neither of which are in the ‘town centre’ most of which area is ‘listed’.  That has not stopped some god awful developments. Medical services appear to fancy the main road as a horn test route, it is also the designated bulk transport route, rather than the motorway 800 yards away, I just hope the sagging bridges fully understand! During the war the joinery works turned out wings for Mosquitoes and floated them down the canal for further assembly. It is now housing for the train dwellers.

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    #16164

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 1,421

    My village has a one stop, a post office that is clinging to life 3 pubs and the masonic lodge, that sells a nice pint, a small 800 year plus old church and a roman bath house on the outskirts.

    So we are good for beer and bathing.

    Our closet town is all of a 20 walk, which was has a traditional high street, but the new (5 yearish) shopping complex , has killed the high street, and made summer traffic a pain, as we live I’m a bit of of tourist cut through. So traffic that was an annoyance is now a right pita.

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    #16168

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 1,195

    Several of the pubs have closed down and become housing. The ‘Railway’ pub has certainly provided a large number of housing units as it was pulled down, the land was cleared and several blocks of flats were constructed, right next to the railway line. Dead easy for commuters, perhaps less easy for sleepers?

    The PO is a couple of counters at the back of a shop so you queue past displays of racks of snack food and greeting cards, fizzy drinks and wine – to relieve the boredom on a slow day? At Christmas it can be grim waiting to get served, but at other times it is much better. The female staff are hugely better than the ‘missing link’ possibly male they briefly, but still for too long employed.

    Great St Mary’s is one of three places of worship it was built from flintstone and mortar on a site that is believed to go back to pre-Domesday times (11th Century). The church has royal connections. Both Elizabeth I and Anne Boleyn, wife of Henry VIII worshipped here.

    As for pubs there are now only three left  as far as I can recall with two of the closing in recent times, neither of the closed pubs were up market establishments, so it was not a surprise they went.

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    #16186

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 1,649

    Pinched this from GENUKI about my village:

    Gilbert de LEKEBURN (or TODWALLE) founded a Priory of Cistercian nuns here shortly before the reign of King John, circa 1150. All the monastic buildings have since disappeared and a more modern mansion built on the site.
    The Anglican parish church is dedicated to All Saints, and was built about 1380 out of chalk.
    The church was thoroughly restored in 1868, seats 240 and is a Grade I listed building with British Heritage.

    Once there were 3 Methodist chapels, now all are private homes. We have a village pump, which was the main source of village water until 1953. That information came from an old chap in his 90’s, now long deceased, shortly after I came here in 2003. The Priory has a long, earthen surface lane winding around to it through old trees. When I first came here I used to take my dog Charlie down the lane, until one day a guy from a house at the entrance told me that the inhabitants of  a mansion at the site of what used to be “The Abbey” objected to my presence on their private road. I answered thus: “It was a Priory, not an Abbey. It has no signage informing of a private road. Therefore I have a perfect right to walk there, until the legal position is correctly communicated to me.” I walked Charlie down there for a week or so, until one day his hackles went up and he adopted a real canine Threat Posture. Looking to the bend in the lane, I saw the biggest black cat I ever saw outside of a zoo. I wish I had taken my camera, but had to drag Charlie away. He really wanted to have some of that animal: it was twice his size, but Charlie tackled anything, which was the reason I had to part with him. He was a Rescue dog and saw any other form of animal life as a threat to me.

    I reported the Big Cat and was told by the RSPCA that it had been seen in other parts of Lincolnshire. It was eventually shot somewhere else, I believe. It was a Puma and I was most pleased that I was unable to make its acqaintance.😅

    Church, in there around the other side are 3 of my mates, I don’t plan on joining them anytime soon.

    Images: Copyright Richard Croft and licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence.

    Pump, handle still attached, still works if needed. There is a huge aquifer beneath the village:

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 3 weeks ago by Bob Williams.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #17294

    Drezha
    Participant
    @drezha
    Forumite Points: 349

    Back on the original subject, I’m waiting for my 5T to arrive. No such luck here for £70 off that PM had, so full price for me.

    But my darling iPhone has been playing up – locking up, becoming unpresonsive and crashing and I’ve no idea why. It’s getting a wipe and a trip back to the Apple store if that doesn’t work. Aim would be to then flog it.

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