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painting over ronseal anti mould paint

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  • #23889
    Participant
    johnbarry
    @johnbarry

    I had mould on the wall round the toilet/basin and pipework, it was cleaned and painted with Ronseal Problem wall paints White Silk Anti-mould paint (6 year protection) I had all the walls painted with the same.

    It’s time to have the bathroom re painted, however if the pipes and walls (now protected) were painted, would this stop the mould protection, would it still work under the next coat of normal paint

    Cheers
    John

Viewing 8 replies - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #23901
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 15,216

    No. The mould would happily grow and feast away as it would be protected by a layer of ordinary paint.

    Some mould growth around damp areas such as shower seals etc is difficult to avoid, but black mould on walls is worrying from a health standpoint. If you are badly troubled by mould on walls you need to look at your ventilation/extraction, and check that outside guttering etc is not blocked or misplaced.

    #23911
    Participant
    Richard
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 6,517

    @Edp put that too mildly. Damp should always be cured at source and the paint is only ever an initial, temporary sticking plaster. Cure the source of the problem via ventilation or other corrective actions, gutters, window frames, DPC, lowering external ground works, and so on. Plaster, mortar and even bricks will suffer if kept damp for too long, some blocks will crumble away and timber will turn to little more than dust. You really do not want mould reactions in humans, my wife has a long standing problem with aspergillosis which is not by any means the worst mould. Mould will seriously affect the property value and if not disclosed during any sale process, can result in court actions .

    #24010
    Participant
    johnbarry
    @johnbarry
    Forumite Points: 4,400

    It looks dirty grubby, in the cold months the condensation on the pipes and porcelain toilet tank, is terrible. Even when the window is open and vent is on. I have to keep bowls under the tank to prevent floods. I once reported it to the housing and they said I need warmth, they fitted a radiator, but it’s still the same.

     

    Cheers
    John

    #24017
    Participant
    Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 12,953

    JB, that toilet looks exactly like mine. Think I asked you this before: are you with Waterloo Housing Group?

    I have terrible damp on an outside wall, beneath guttering and the large lounge window. Due to clay roof tiles, there is a lot of moss on the roof which the birds turn over to look for eggs, larvae and insects. This rolls down the roof and into the guttering, blocking it and causing overspill when it rains, all down that corner where the damp/mould is. It has been treated by our decorator in 2015 with anti-mould paint, but is coming again.

    I was particularly interested in Richard’s information regarding health risks. My wife has an ongoing, hacking cough and so far no scans, cameras etc. have discovered a cause. Thanks for that Richard, looking it up and using what I find for GP’s ammunition and more reports to our bloody useless, deaf & blind, incompetent landlord.

    Before treatment pic.

    I have another corner on the same wall which was like this. Treatment was 2015, I know it’s coming back and I know the guttering overspill is causing this. Landlord refuses to do any gutter clearance until September. I asked them to phone before they come last year, they didn’t. We were in, neighbour was out and we had no key for her place. There are 6 bungalows, link-connected by a small utility room. There is no access to the rear of any except No’s 1 and 6. I live at No.5, neighbour at No.4. Totally fed up with this landlord now, they are about to become the largest Social Housing group in the UK with yet another merger. i am going to report this and several other problems, then give them a timeline. If I don’t have a result, I move to Health & Safety Executive and local Environmental Housing.

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #24039
    Participant
    johnbarry
    @johnbarry
    Forumite Points: 4,400

    No Bob I am not with the same group.

    I have a lot of roof moss, wich ends in the guttering, then onto the car. Never noticed damp from the guttering, it’s just in the shower (bath) room.

    The mould on yours is a bad un, I am wondering if damp is a bungalow propblem, there are 4 bungalows in a row connected by an entry (passage) between me and next door.

    If the paint protection lasts 2-3 years (as yours) I could live with that.

    Cheers
    John

    #24041
    Participant
    Richard
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 6,517

    Bob, my wife went through 5 years of tests and checks until someone realised that a £5 blood test* would find the yes or no answer within days.

    *The cost might be a bit more than £5, but a whole hell of a lot less than heart traces, echo cardiograms, etc.

    UK construction quality varies from dismal to wot’s quality work? Cheap appears to understate how poor some results can be and in both cases the walls and maintaining them appear insufficient for the job. To me it is significant that the damp is worse at the ground level and less bad further up, I wonder if three is a DPC, problem (I trust there is a DPC), a splashing up issue from the dripping gutters or a similar problem or problems intertwined.  A rendered wall with poor render or bad pointing can be other issues. While I hate polystyrene with a vengeance, on the external surface and rendered it could be helpful. However, it must be done with professional care, Mr Erp and his helpers are NOT required.

    #24045
    Participant
    Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 15,216

    Cement rendering conceals a multitude of issues, it can also cause damp and brick rot by preventing the bricks from breathing. Horrible stuff – looks nice initially but I would never put money into a property that had it.

    #24047
    Participant
    JayCeeDee
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 4,748

    Damp can be a problem for any building no matter how small or tall. The solution is available to all house-builders – DPC’s of all varieties – they just need to be installed properly, along with guttering and pipes to take rainwater away. They then need to be maintained and respected ie. not broken or interfered with or negated by subsequent work. ( I had a friend who had a patio built by some idiots who didn’t set the upper level below the DPC!! )

    I have a relative who rented a bungalow that had terrible damp problems – even interior walls needed anti-mould painting every year – they had a few damp “experts” in to find the problem and one reckoned that whoever built it had run heating and water pipes in the concrete base and had been compromised by either movement or chemical interaction.

Viewing 8 replies - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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