St George's Day

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This topic contains 16 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 3 weeks, 5 days ago.

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  • #32872

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg

    Before getting my train home I was wandering down Keynsham High Street looking for a Greggs for lunch when a fully mailed knight with spear came strolling down the pavement.

    Marvellous.

    I did wonder f it was the local MP, a certain Mr Rees-Mogg, but no glasses and a lot of beard.

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  • #32874

    Bob Williams
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    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,935

    Yes, happy St. George’s Day everyone!

    Reminded of a conversation on a train going home on leave some years ago, between myself and a very drunk, very Scottish sailor. He was in full Anti-Sassenach mode and trying to wind up the carriage population of myself, a well-dressed elderly gent and two young girls. After receiving no result from his wind up tactics, he began to lecture us about national icons, comparing the big deals that Ireland, Scotland and Wales made about their various National Days. The elderly gent cleared his throat: “I feel no necessity to boast about being English. I do not view pride in my country in terms of either superiority or inferiority.”

    The inebriated Jock struggled to understand this, failed, and stood to confront the old guy. I put an arm lock on him, turned him and threw him out of the door, obligingly opened by one of the girls. I chucked his kitbag out after him and shoved him far down the train, promising to batter him if he returned. He didn’t. Not that I am anti-Scot, I have relatives and many friends in Scotland.

    Since moving to Lincolnshire I have noticed that there are lots of flags out here every April 23rd. Malta will be a sea of flags today, not because they are supporting England, but because St. George is also their National Icon.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #32876

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,935

    I just found this on FB:

    What a brilliant photo, and a wonderful anti-racist poke in the eye.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #32877

    JayCeeDee
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    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 1,165

    It looks like he’s just nicked a Crusader’s horse!!!😀😂😋

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    #32878

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 2,448

    I celebrated st Georges day by having a little girl 11years ago today. Though she is Welsh so errmm… I tried.

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    #32880

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 2,027

    Keynsham is a strange place, half way between Bristol and Bath and famous hereabouts as the home of the Fry’s chocolate factory, later Cadburys, and shut by the lying Kraft Foods after they took over. For those of a certain age it was also known for Horace Batchelor’s “Famous Infra-Draw Method” adverts on Radio Luxembourg that he claimed increased the chances of winning large sums on the football pools.

    In the 70’s they revived an early 19th Century Mummers Play on Boxing Day with a very St Georges theme, but mixed with Father Christmas, a doctor and a shepherdess.

    Told you it was a weird place. Might explain their choice of MP.

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    #32889

    dwynnehugh
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    @dwynnehugh
    Forumite Points: 745

     

    “Horace Batchelor’s “Famous Infra-Draw Method” – God, Dave that takes me back a few years, quite a few years – quite a few years too many actually!! Lol😋

    The more you meet people the more you understand why Noah took animals instead of humans

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    #32890

    JayCeeDee
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    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 1,165

    “Horace Batchelor’s “Famous Infra-Draw Method” – God, Dave that takes me back a few years, quite a few years – quite a few years too many actually!! Lol😋

    I remember that too – they used to spell K E Y N S H A M  out and as far as “postcodes” went, it was ‘near’ Bristol!!

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    #32893

    Richard
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    @sawboman
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    The ‘club’ of those who remember Horace has non exclusive membership, after all I am in that group.

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    #32894

    Les.
    Participant
    @oldles
    Forumite Points: 476

    B***er, just lost message, my fault.

    Anyway, Richard, not that exclusive, I am in there too. In 1954 i built my first crystal set, and the first thing I heard (light Prog) was Eartha Kitt, singing I love Paris.The following year I built a one valve radio on which I could listen to RL in bed at night. Sunday night esp for the Top 20. Regular HB advert.

    JayCeeDee, no post codes, not created back then. I bought my first house in 1966, and sold it in 1971. On one of those occasions, my solicitor asked for my full address. I duly gave it, ending with the post code. “We don’t bother with those” was his reply. Well, be it 1966 or 1971, post codes well out then, but had not been out for long. You don’t get far without one today!

    Les.

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    #32897

    JayCeeDee
    Participant
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 1,165

    JayCeeDee, no post codes, not created back then.

    Les – that’s why I had it in quotation marks.😁😁

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    #32898

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,007

    Yes Les that is why I called it non exclusive as I am a member. I to built a crystal set later replaced by a ‘transistor set’ built from a ‘Henry Radio’ kit. Then a amplifier kit I bought from a local outlet to boost the performance via a transistor amp failed to include the required transistor… some further shopping located a suitable item. I used that one illicitly to listen to the launch one of the early orbiting satellites. It could perhaps have been Telstar?

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    #32899

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,935

    I bought one of these with my newspaper and butcher deliveries pay, sometime in ’59 or ’60 I think:

    It lasted right up to the 1970’s, when I gave it to a nephew who (predictably) broke it. I used to listen to Radio Luxembourg under the bedclothes lol, which is where I heard the Horace Batchelor ad, over and over again. Then the Pirate stations came in: in 1964 it went with 8 mates and myself to a Blackpool boarding house for two weeks. We listened to Radio Caroline on the beach, it was a ‘Bird Magnet’. Bopping and jiving on Blackpool beach, seemed like every day was sunny but that may be selective memory! The tranny (original meaning!) took one of these monsters to power it and IIRC it lasted quite a long time:

    1964 is full of memories for me, any songs from that year take me into Full Nostalgia Mode.

    That old Tranny radio went all around the world with me as a Junior Deckhand, later in Army service. I bought bigger and better HiFi’s over the years, but that Tranny was always with me on exercises. I actually shoved Bad Nephew in a pond for breaking it.

    Think he forgave me before he passed away.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #32901

    dwynnehugh
    Participant
    @dwynnehugh
    Forumite Points: 745

    Memories – my first decent radio was a Roberts Radio and followed a few years later by a ‘Hacker’ make – superb quality and build – gave me very good service for years – all though Uni and a good few years afterwards – wooden body and it took 2 x PP3s (the big 9v batteries) – no main adaptors in those days it was build your own!

    The more you meet people the more you understand why Noah took animals instead of humans

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    #32906

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,935

    In the late 1970’s, my parents’ pre – war radio finally gave up the struggle. Think that was a Murphy, but I always used to nag them to replace the horrible, clunky old MW/LW set with something newer. I bought them a really nice set and have been racking my brain trying to remember the make, which was definitely British, and find another example to post here. It was in light teak wood, long and low, with twin speakers either side of the Tuning panel and was stereo, with FM/MW. It was a really good looking piece of kit, with the bonus that it could be further tuned (thanks to a Royal Signals nephew!) to pick up ‘extra’ VHF, including Police frequencies.

    Now I know how naughty that is, but it did amuse me for a while, listening to various weekend chases, etc. The pleasure soon palled, but my old mam found it immensely entertaining and would listen for hours, until I bought her a set of headphones, which made it even more exciting for her. Only she knew what was happening in her head!

    I would love to know what set that was, it had really good clear reception. It died once about ’84, but those were still the days when there were local Radio/TV repair shops and I took it to a Mansfield firm which repaired it good as new. It continued to work well right up to mam’s death in ’89, whereupon I gave it to a newly-married relative. AFAIK he still has it, it was there when last seen in 2012 and still working well.

    EDIT: I believe our peerless leader Lee is the man to know about vintage radio and TV.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by Bob Williams.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #32912

    Les.
    Participant
    @oldles
    Forumite Points: 476

    A follower here, not a leader. How about Dynatron? They made a few long low wide things. Most of the setmakers (Ferguson, HMV, Marconi (all the same lot), Murphy and of course Pye/Philips.

    I bought my first Stereo gram in 1967, a German NordMende. It knocked spots of all the British sets I compared it with in the local shops. Early days of Radio Stoke, and some of the others would not pull it in. After about 12 months I bought a retro-fit stereo decoder for it. Back then, and for the previous 15+ years, British sets were built down to a price, German sets were generally built up to a specification.

    I have had more TVs and radios by NordMende since then (not counting all the Grundig CTVs I bought, reconditioned and sold on from 1980 to 1990.

    Les.

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    #32922

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 2,935

    One of my cousins from Stoke married a guy who worked for the original GEC computers of Coventry. I have not seen either of them for many years, but I remember him well. He began work with my uncle at his radio and TV business, which is where he met my cuz. He became something of an electronics genius and my cuz supported him as a mature UNI student, from where he began work at GEC. I remember him investigating the birth of Stereophonic systems: he had a solid old Grundig Mono radiogram, which he stripped at weekends and converted to a stereogram, probably using parts from work I suspect! I would have been around 10, possibly circa 1955 or 56, when I went to their home and saw the old Grundig in pieces all over the lounge floor. My cuz was totally unbothered by this, being used to him tearing stuff apart and rebuilding it to work in better ways. Eventually another cousin built a custom workshop for him. I would imagine that the big house he eventually had in Cheshire, was fitted with all the latest entertainment stuff.

    Years later, he was a Big Noise in GEC Computers before it eventually crashed and burned, and the company was asked to send someone to Poland to set up systems there. At the time of course, Poland was a Communist bloc nation. Immediately after landing, he was escorted into a black limo and driven away to another airport: he thought then it must have been military. He was flown into Russia, disappeared and the Foreign Office went ballistic. He was eventually returned after several days, unharmed physically but badly shaken. He told my dad and uncle (his FIL) that he had been interrogated about his knowledge of those first computers. When asked what he told them, he said “Everything I knew: I wanted to get home to my wife and kids!”

    Going back to radiograms: for my 14th Christmas, my dad bought me a Murphy mono ‘gram. That would have been 1959 and it was so heavy that it took dad and my big bro to hump it into my bedroom! It was there when I came back from yet another Christmas in Wolstanton with my cousin Bill. Newspaper and butcher shop delivery earnings took a big hit in January 1960, as I began buying records! All Shook Up, Jailhouse Rock, I Got stung/One Night, were the first singles I bought, being an Elvis fan. Not long after that, I bought “Only The Lonely” by Roy Orbison. I bought an old Grundig tape recorder and used to borrow records from the two girls across the road, record them with a blanket over the speakers. They did the same with their own radiogram and tape, which were much better than mine.

    Ahhhhh memories!

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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