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This topic contains 17 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 6 days, 11 hours ago.

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  • #38045

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2

    New information, received from the company that delivered my lovely new Swivel/Recliner chair. Looking at the old faux-leather sw/rec chair, which has bald patches on the arms and at the head, the handler (who also owns the company) said “You sit with your arms on the chair arms and rest your head at the back, right?”  Yes, says I.  “And you take Statins, don’t you?”

    When I asked how the flipping heck he knew that, he said “I researched it after quite a few older people had the same experience with faux leather and vinyl furniture materials, bought from here. Apparently the Statins – any Statins – produce a substance from male skin which affects the material. If you keep the chair, use a throw over it when you sit in it. It is less expensive for me to tell all my customers this, than have to look into warranties”

    I know there are some of us older Forumites who might be taking Statins, so this is a heads up lads! It apparently has a lesser effect upon leather, which means I had better ask my daughter to give me something to sit on her leather settee.

    I was a bit astonished by that, but it wasn’t the only thing we learned from this very knowledgeable  and intelligent young man. Last week, myself and the mem’sahib were touring furniture shops and looking for two good armchairs. We both had particular requirements: my Gert being only 4’9″ needs a small seat height and recliner, I need a standard seat but a fixed chair, don’t like armchair recliners*. We had been everywhere online and in Louth, Grimsby and Lincoln, could not find our specifics. Then we thought of Askews in Alford, just a few miles away in a large, converted Church. That’s when we met this young guy. He took a lot of time, measured my Gert sitting in a chair almost low enough, measured her from front to back and side to side. Did the same with me. Then started showing us some catalogues and came up with what we wanted. A fixed chair for me and something called a ‘Super Petite’ electric recliner for my SWMBO, both in the same model range, fabric and style. Then I noticed an ex-display swivel recliner, reduced from >£900 to £375. The store get these ex-display items cheaper because they have been on display at an exhibition or trade fair, and can’t be sold by the company displaying them. I sat in it, operated it and could have fallen asleep in it. They brought it today. I love it and it’s a really thick fabric almost the same material as the chairs will be, so I won’t be paint-stripping that material with my corrosive Statin grease!

    The chairs are special order from a British company in my birth county of Nottinghamshire, situated on a big trading estate near the Derbyshire border. They will not be here before January, but we don’t need them until granddaughter moves into her new home and can take them away. If we are still not ready, Askews will store them for us in a separate warehouse.

    We have never had such good service and help from any shop, especially a furniture store. I made the lad laugh with my description of SCS – ‘Some Crap Sofas’ and DFS – Dumb Furniture Shop’. He told me that much of SCS & DFS furniture is actually made in China.

    *But I love swivel recliners!

     

    • This topic was modified 1 week, 3 days ago by Bob Williams.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

Viewing 17 replies - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
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  • #38054

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 7,622

    I suspect it has naff all to do with statins, and more to do with such chairs being generally used by the elderly. It is probably associated with the ‘Old Person Smell’ phenomenon.  There is more on this link, but in essence body chemistry changes with age.

    The more techy bit is in this extract from the link:

    “As people age, fatty acid production in the skin increases while antioxidant production decreases. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are oxidized, sometimes increasing the amount of a chemical called 2-nonenal. Nonenal is an unsaturated aldehyde known for its grassy, greasy scent. Some researchers did not detect 2-nonenal; however, they did find higher levels of the funky organics nonanal, dimethylsulfone, and benzothiazole in the body odor of older subjects.”

    I would guess that fatty acids are the faux leather guilty party.

    Total aside, but ‘old person smell’ is a social no-no in Japan and as a result there is  a fairly large market for deodorants that mask these odours.

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    #38059

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    Statins get the blame for everything.

    Personally even if true I’ll put up with those sorts of side effects than not take the statin. This is exactly the same sort of fake news as the MMR jab rubbish.

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    #38060

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    I have no direct evidence that Statins are to blame for the chair damage, but I do know that ever since I have taken them, my coat and shirt collars have become marked with a greasy streak. I researched myself and read that older males produce fatty acid, as Ed has found. I eventually concluded that I am indeed an older male, despite my brain still refusing to believe I have not been 18 for quite a long time. So I did more research and found so many conflicting reports among supposedly professional bodies. More confused than ever, I eventually found The Lancet:

    https://tinyurl.com/y6qhjlrd

    This proves that Dave is right to believe that the side effects are worth the act of taking Statins. Quoting from the Lancet’s long and worthy but verbose report: –

    We found significant reductions in major coronary events in all age groups (including those older than 75 years at randomisation), but the trend towards smaller relative reductions with increasing age persisted, even after excluding heart failure and dialysis trials. ” ….   “However, as the absolute risk of these events was higher in older people, the absolute benefits were similar to, if not greater than, those at younger ages.

    Reading so many other sources has also convinced me that too many medical and health “experts” can never agree on any one subject to save either their own lives or anyone else’s. Many of the American publications gave screeds of apparently authentic information, followed by an “offer” to purchase something. I then recalled an appointment with a former GP, the late Dr. Terry Butler. in my previous home village. This was at a time when the Cholesterol was the latest medical buzz word and the surgery had recently taken on an enthusiastic Practice Nurse, who organised “Well Man” clinics. (for both genders: pre-feminist) This young lady tested me, asked my diet and told me to stop eating eggs, which I love in all their cooked forms. Weeks later I had a work injury, saw Dr. Tel and told him. He looked at my Cholesterol reading and laughed, checked it again and laughed a bit more. “It was within limits, just slightly higher. Are you eating eggs?”   “No Doc, I took her advice.”   “Well ignore it. She’s new, but eggs are not. In moderation, properly cooked, they are a good source of protein. Your work is demanding and physical, you need protein. Eat them.”

    More fake news, more half-trained experts.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #38063

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 7,622

    While most people tolerate statins I do not, and started getting ‘peripheral nerve damage’. This is apparently not too common but I got. numb areas on fingers/toes and some associated nerve crosstalk e.g. touch being equated as pain. It probably was due to my switching to a fairly low fat diet.  Possibly too high a dose of statins stopped replenishment of the cholesterol that normally insulates nerve sheaths. I stopped taking statins and after a while everything went back to a healthy normal as did my cholesterol levels.

    Cholesterol is a difficult subject to handle as it is an essential constituent of the brain and nerves. As in all bodily functions it is a question of balance, but many research areas are now pointing to the role of bad-breath caries bacteria in the gut getting swept into the blood stream and becoming a cause of plaque build-up in the arteries. Some think that is why sugar which feeds the bugs is bad for you, and why scourging materials such as non-digestible brans are good for you. Other dietary things which are apparently good are in the main fermented in some way and possibly have an anti-caries function. Incidentally statins also have an anti-bacterial function – link so don’t stop taking them unless they have unacceptable side-effects!

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    #38068

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    Interesting article Ed. I will definitely not stop taking Pravastatin. I was originally prescribed Atorvastatin but that did have side effects of making me dizzy and short of breath. My very good West African GP was quick to prescribe Pravastatin, telling me to report back if the dizzy spells continued after two weeks. In fact they stopped within days and I am now even more aware that the benefits of Statins outweigh any disadvantages I had. As I was not aware of the skin effluent until now, if that is all the problems caused, I shall continue with it.

    I do take a cocktail of other tablets, although the same efficient GP spoke to my two consultants and had 3 medicines removed as either unnecessary or actually conflicting with others. Having reflux, Barretts Oesophagus, a hiatus hernia, parastomal hernia, no gall bladder, no spleen and a partial pancreotomy after the cancer, requires a medicinal balancing act to restore at least partial function to my battered old internals. The medicines chart on our kitchen cupboard is interesting, let’s say…

    The one thing I do appreciate is that I have never needed medical assistance to sleep. My mother took sleeping tablets for many years and would snore heavily, then wake after 4 hours. I would pity my dad if he did not have the same heavy natural sleep that I share, albeit broken twice nightly by the effects of an enlarged prostate. My missus will say that I can sleep for England, but it is a good thing that the prostate usually wakes me in time!

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Bob Williams.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #38108

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    Interesting about the nerve damage Ed. It’s extremely painful if I knock or crush my fingers these days, ridiculously so. My Mrs thinks I’m just being a big baby – despite knowing how I’ve coped with 24 / 7 pain from my various worn out or physically damaged joints.

    The nerve sheaths being damaged would explain a lot, but I’ll live with that if it means my chances of another heart attack are lessened. The medication and life style changes are keeping all the major indicators firmly in the green.

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    #38111

    The VFM Addict
    Participant
    @thevfmaddict
    Forumite Points: 1,849

    Dave,

    Has your serum magnesium been checked when your bloods were done?

    Few doctors, GP’s or Consultants, are up to speed on the growing body of evidence of its importance in CHD.    Mg+ deficiency is devastating in the long term for cardiac health.   Also if you do suffer another heart attack you are far more likely to survive if your levels are good because such allows cardiac cells to survive longer periods of ischemia.

    The following two articles from the BMJ’s online OpenHeart journal are well worth a read.

    https://openheart.bmj.com/content/openhrt/5/2/e000775.full.pdf

    https://openheart.bmj.com/content/openhrt/5/1/e000668.full.pdf

    If you haven’t had your serum magnesium levels checked make sure they are next time your bloods are done.

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    Here's hoping the Mad Tangerine of the West and the Mad Monk of the East stay friends or we're all in trouble

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    #38114

    The VFM Addict
    Participant
    @thevfmaddict
    Forumite Points: 1,849

    Oh, I forgot to add that if you are either Diabetic or take a PPI or Diuretics; or drink a lot of fizzy drinks or suffer IBS, then it is more likely than not that you will be Mg+ deficient.

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    Here's hoping the Mad Tangerine of the West and the Mad Monk of the East stay friends or we're all in trouble

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    #38126

    Dave Rice
    Moderator
    @ricedg
    Forumite Points: 3,850

    Thanks, I’ll check that out. I am on diuretics. More bananas required!

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    #38130

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 4,240

    No one told I was going to start leaking when I’m old!!!

    I’m only 40and bit are already failing. I don’t to leak as well. FFS.

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    #38131

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 7,622

    I found the first article very interesting in that it linked a magnesium deficiency to increased skin fatty acids, and I guess the ‘old person smell’. Perhaps a self test for incipient problems is that collars and cuffs get dirty more quickly!

    “Intracellular magnesium deficiency may also cause an increase in intracellular sodium and calcium, which predisposes to arterial vasospasm, increased catecholamine release, increased fatty acids and lipids, as well as intravascular hypercoagulability.”

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by Ed P.
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    #38139

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    No one told I was going to start leaking when I’m old!!! I’m only 40and bit are already failing. I don’t to leak as well. FFS.

    Everybody leaks Steve, calm down la! Everybody’s skin leaks, just gets worse as we get older. Put the Puncture Repair kit away!

    I leak a bit more than usual because * I’m an oldphart, * I take Statins, * I also have a Middle East bug in my Lymph system that makes it worse: I have to shower in stuff that surgeons use to scrub up, or I come out in boils due to infected lymph in hair follicles, of which I have zillions because I am a hairy bugga.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #38140

    Les.
    Participant
    @oldles
    Forumite Points: 987

    Steve, when you say “Leak when old”, do you mean leaking as Bob describes the deposit on his furniture, or are you thinking of the dripping tap down below?

    We all know the little rhyme  —  “No matter how you shake your peg, the last few drops run down your leg”.

    My second wife, who was NOT a member of the medical profession, used to subscribe to “The Practitioner”, the Doctors’ monthly comic. In about 1980, there was a “Symposium on Incontinence” in one particular issue. One subject they discussed was the topic of the above rhyme. A simple solution was offered. Place two fingers underneath immediately forward of the anus, and gently press and draw forward. Do that after your pee, and you will see those last few drops drip forth, leaving leg dry. Been doing that for 40 years, as the rhyme was already a reality.

    I guess I am lucky, older than most of you, and the only time I sweat is when I do a birthday log chopping session, so no deposits on furniture. I drink PLENTY of water, pee well but slowly, only wake up once most nights, drink water whilst sitting on side of bed, go and pee, and (usually) straight back to sleep. I do take an Mg+ supplement.

    Les.

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    #38144

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    Les I have an enlarged prostate and it’s at least once a night for a toilet visit, or swim! I always go straight back to sleep though. With prostate trouble your method does not work, it’s a couple of sheets of toilet paper and wait, then maybe wait some more. No good leaving before the system says it’s done!

    I have a great memory of a 60’s music show starring the great but totally bonkers Wayne Fontana. Comes on in a white suit and hat, sings a few, tells stories about his life. He had a huge potbelly hanging over his belt and confessed that he hates having to wait so long over the toilet bowl, because he can no longer see when he’s finished.

    Still has a great voice though.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #38150

    The VFM Addict
    Participant
    @thevfmaddict
    Forumite Points: 1,849

    I found the first article very interesting in that it linked a magnesium deficiency to increased skin fatty acids, and I guess the ‘old person smell’. Perhaps a self test for incipient problems is that collars and cuffs get dirty more quickly! “Intracellular magnesium deficiency may also cause an increase in intracellular sodium and calcium, which predisposes to arterial vasospasm, increased catecholamine release, increased fatty acids and lipids, as well as intravascular hypercoagulability.”

    Pretty much coronary vasospasm only ever occurs when there is an excess on intracellular calcium ions in the presence  of a hypersensitive vasculature.     Magnesium is often referred to as nature’s natural calcium antagonist.     So it plays a big role in controlling intracellular calcium ions.

    Coronary vasospasm is not exercise induced so can occur at rest.   Usually it is referred to as unstable angina.     Heart attacks that derive in major part from vasospasm are called Non-STEMI. This is because the patient’s ECG trace shows no sign of ST wave elevation which is the norm with most Myocardial Infarctions.    If anything one will usually see a mildly depressed ST wave rather than an  elevated wave.    The depression is often so subtle that ambulance crews miss it and hence pick up more slowly on Non-STEMI’s that normal heart attacks.    Such a failure almost cost my other half dearly but as I have considerable experience of discussing ECG traces with senior cardiologists and had seen mildly ST depressed traces on two consecutive days, I put my foot down and they took her in.   At hospital they were overheard saying to another crew that I was worrying too much.   My other half did not tell me about that until after they had left the unit.   Lucky for them or I’d have made them eat the paper her blood results then came on.    Her tropinin (a cardiac enzyme marker indicative of an M.I.) was at 2000 and anything above 10 strongly suggests an M.I.    In the event an angiogram showed that she needed either an immediate triple bypass or multiple stents.

    Generally speaking Non-STEMI’s tend to cause less extensive pain and are more frequently ‘silent’ that STEMI’s.     This means they are often mistaken for simply a transient angina attack.    Add to this that women more frequently suffer silent M.I’s than do men and one needs to be doubly cautious if there is even the slightest chance that a woman has suffered an M.I.    Oh BTW the pain suffered by women is often upper abdominal rather than classic central chest, neck and left arm and this atypical presentation too can incline to the infarct not being immediately suspected.

    I am, due to all of such, somewhat uncomfortable with our local protocol which is that ambulance crews only take STEMI’s direct to Harefield Hospital and all other suspected M.I’s go first to our local general.  The risk, especially in the winter, is that Non-STEMI patients sit for some time in the log jam of ambulance trolleys at the local general before they have their bloods taken and their M.I. is confirmed.   My other half benefits from me knowing my stuff and being confident enough to state a case immediately and compellingly to medics.    But most folks though have to trust in the ambulance crews and in my experience many are inadequately trained in recognising when one is looking almost certainly looking at a Non-STEMI’s.    Rant over.

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    Here's hoping the Mad Tangerine of the West and the Mad Monk of the East stay friends or we're all in trouble

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    #38152

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 4,240

    I was just joking bob. I’ll just add leaking to the list of thing to hope I get to experiance. 😉

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    #38157

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,284

    Believe me Steve, you don’t need to experience it! Ever.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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