Sunday, Rest Day?

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Bob Williams 1 week, 1 day ago.

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  • #34734

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman

    Well not quite. As is my try to be regular I took my wife’s car out for its weekly exercise run and all was well. The roads before 07:00 were deserted, and I was easily able to stop to fill it up with fuel, the first time since January.

    Home coming was not so great; “The tumble drier is not working.” was the repeated cry of anguish. Now I have sorted this out in the past, so this time breakfast and several cups of tea plus several over due medicines called.

    Once that was more or less done out came the shop vacuum and the screw driver. Off came the front and to say that there was a bit of fluff in the inlet was far from the truth, it was more like a whole kennel full of ‘knit a Husky kit’, so much so that a hand clearing into the bin was the first order of business. Several moments of vacuuming later and the machine fired up as it should. Maybe that should be a monthly routine in future?

    All in all that got the day off to a rather better start than might have been the case, though it did serve to show how my ability to get down and dirty with machinery has deteriorated since I last did anything with the machines to sort them out. A few light pain killers were added to my start the morning medicine cart to sort me out.

    The sight that there had been overnight rain was a gardening bonus as it freshened things up, but probably did little else.

    • This topic was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by Richard.
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  • #34750

    Bob Williams
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    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    Richard I feel your domestic-issue pain! Had the same problem with our first tumble drier years ago: an ancient item inherited from my MIL which gave unending pain and which I stripped down so many times I believe I could have done it blindfolded. Then we bought another which has a filter mesh than can be removed after every operation: had it a good few years now and it does sterling work. It sits in the Utility Room below a window, which is ideal as I can clip on the outlet pipe and hang it out of said window. I understand your battle with machinery and how that takes more time as we age: for me it is the shaking left hand and arm, with the loss of strength as well in that limb. Nerve damage is a bugga.

    We spent most of our day in Cleethorpes, initially in Cleethorpes Country Park, which is not as good as it sounds, there is nothing there but a huge lake, a long path around it, wildfowl and a special lake for dogs to swim in. It’s marked “For dog swimming ONLY” and there were several dogs enjoying it. North East Lincs Council has decided to let the whole place go wild and it has actually improved it, there is much more wildlife and only about the first 6″ of verges are cut back. Then on to Cleethorpes itself and a cruise up and down the prom car park until some kind soul went home and left us a space. A good walk to the north then down to the south end and back to the car. Dinner in “The Trawlerman” was the best of carveries and back home to dead head some roses. If I did not have the time-consuming procedure that is a change of my stoma pouch every morning, we would be able to get away earlier. Oh well, at least we are still getting out. And I am still here. And the sun shone for us all afternoon.

    The Trawlerman: https://tinyurl.com/y4ztrowj   A lovely meal, a large, very well organised pub with an extensive menu.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by Bob Williams.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #34774

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,204

    Bob, I know what you mean about dead heading roses, I should do the one on the right in this picture, but it is somewhere between 6 and 9 feet above the ground and I have huge problems with that sort of reach these days. I have just remembered that I do have a pole pruner that I might be able to use; they tell me there might be another day tomorrow. I should try to get those old heads off as it did possibly the best ever show it has given this year and will now be wasting energy on seed heads that no one wants.

    Anyway the point of the picture is that a few weeks ago I wrote about working on the rose arch and the pink/red rose on the left was the beneficiary of that attention. It is not yet in full bloom; I am hoping for some further blooms to make its show a little more complete, perhaps I shall have to wait for next year’s performance. I can see a lot of new growth so the promise is there.

    The job on the tumble drier was not in the normal filter area, that is cleared after every use; this was a strip down variety of action with a torch and probes exploring its inner workings. I should do it more frequently in the future; it is a gas machine so at least the interlocks did what they should do in stopping it lighting when it was not happy.

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    #34776

    JayCeeDee
    Participant
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 1,295

    Well – it just shows you’re never too old to learn!!  I never realised that gas tumble dryers were a thing or even existed prior to today, despite, so it seems, most Launderettes using them. Google brought me up to speed!

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    #34777

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    Richard I use a stepladder to get at my roses on the rear garden arbour and to get at the ones on the front around the door.

    Front:  now up to the guttering since this pic last week there are many more blooms and more dead. The blooms are huge and I need to tie them up. I found that the rubber coated wire from a local garden centre is best for that and can be reused.

    Rear, in 2015; don’t have latest but the red rose is now dying and will be replaced. The yellow rose was a mass of blooms until two weeks ago, then heavy rain did for them. This arbour is now a disappointment. My gson took out the conifers earlier this year. They had grown much higher and I thought that more sun would help, out of the shade of the conifers. Ther have been many, many ‘suckers’ on the yellow rose. I have planted more this year elsewhere, but they will not show until next year. Climbers grow well on the front (SSW facing) but not bush/patio roses. Reverse is true on the rear.

    I put the stepladder on the slab to prune and deadhead. At 5’5″ I need it!

    JCD, I didn’t know there were gas tumble driers either!

     

     

     

     

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #34779

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,204

    I am now in trouble using any step unless they come with hand rails, so I can go for three or four stability points. It’s due to spinal issues,  the signals telling me how well my legs are set get lost, (balance is not all down to the ears). I have an MRI later today; for the moment the step ladder is out of the question unless I can fit it with hand rails and a harness! Even then I would lack confidence. If I turn too quickly, I loose visual stabilisation; I have fallen obeying Newton’s gravitational discovery a few times, so far with only bruising and no breakages. It is a bit limiting to put it bluntly; the lopper should be a practical tool as I should be able to limit my head movement and lean against a chair back for added stability. It is worth a try to keep the rose flowering well.

    Like you Bob, I like the colour and vigour roses bring to a plot and yours are clearly doing their thing with you. Some of mine are approaching 30 years and the end of their life, but others are really doing quite well and flourishing. I fear they have all had much the same treatment, with periods of neglect and periods of care cross playing with each other. I am targetting increased care, but…

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Richard.
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    #34783

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,204

    Correction, it was a pole pruner, not the lopper that I used and though I took off multiple dozen dead heads, when I came in I could see there were still more that leered at me. Still, there is a new day tomorrow.

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    #34785

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    There are always more hiding behind the ones you see! My big pink front rose is a Queen Elizabeth and when I bought it, I was told that it would not grow beyond 6 feet. It is at least 2 feet beyond that now and still going. This year there are so many blooms in clusters, that I have to watch for the first signs of a bloom beginning to go, as there are always another 2 or 3 buds behind it. I am a big believer in a combination of rich compost and bone meal at first planting, with a little dried blood. My dad used to literally breathe on his roses, said it adds CO². I can imagine how that works, but I try to do it when no one else is looking: neighbours already believe I am not the full shilling, because I whistle to the blackbirds and thrushes. The fact that the birds sing back to me, has escaped them.

    I have an extendable lopper which of course would be useless for pruning, but I am OK on the stepladders. (so far) The Lopper has been a great tool over the years. I used it a couple of days ago to cut back the Red Robin Tree, which had grown to over 6 feet.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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    #34786

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,204

    Bob, you are right, this year has been one for every rose aspiring to become an astronaut. Even some normally shorter items have grown taller than usual including, but by no means limited to, a couple of bush-rose cuttings I made several years ago. I have made a small but more determined foray into the world of taking cuttings this year. I have dabbled in the past rooting bits of geranium or probably more accurately pelargonium, via roses, chrysanthemums and now rosemary. At least these are all low level activities, no step ladder required. The rosemary mother plant is possibly about 20 years old now and having read that they usually only live for about 10 years, cannot stand the cold, need restricted water supplies, etc. I guess it is living on borrowed time. It has become a bit over sized and having large amounts of ‘old wood’ it is unlikely to deal well with hard pruning. They only regrow from recent growth sections and not from older wood parts. It is possibly now close to 5~6 feet tall and 6 feet wide, so it is not a tidy little potted plant. If the cuttings take I may aim for the more modest form by regular clipping and perhaps culinary use of the clippings.

    I had my MRI last night, thank goodness I could get comfortable as I was in the machine for a long time. I did not check the time but it was something like 40~45 minutes. The only issue was getting up after the scans had been run, that took me several minutes before I could lumber off zigzag fashion, to get changed.

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    #34792

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 3,306

    I had a Honeysuckle like that Richard, when I lived in Notts. Originally across a fence destroyed by vandals, I cut it back severely and replanted it temporarily. A builder mate built me a wall of concrete slabs across the rear and I replanted it, digging in liberal amounts of compost, To my amazement, in the next few years it grew up and across, eventually to cover a 40 foot wall to a height of seven feet! I brought a cutting here to our first Lincolnshire home but it did not like the soil.

    I have been informed after a blood test that my right kidney is losing function. I need another blood test and an MRI scan to investigate that and my prostate, which has flared up again. Not exactly happy, but what is to be, will be.

    “If you think this Universe is bad, you should see some of the others.”
    ― Philip K. Dick, legendary SF writer.

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