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Used car buying advice

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  • #10887
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 2PlaneMan
    @planeman

    Looking at a few cars tomorrow and was wondering if anyone had any advice?

    I’ve not needed a car for years (more than 10) so I’m a bit rusty. I know the basics like checking the dipstick, tires, steering wheel, gear knob, wear to the interior and pedals.

    It’s Skoda Citigo’s I’m looking at, all 3 years old, SE spec (all I need) and from a big car supermarket place near me.

    I’m aware that the sales people at this place like to rush you and try and get you sign up for credit but I’ll be paying all in one go.

    T.I.A

Viewing 20 replies - 41 through 60 (of 459 total)
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  • #10980
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 3The Duke
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 11,396

    Mighty car mods (a huge Aus you tube channel) just shoe horned a 1.6 vtec out of an older civic type r into an old late original mini. Obviously uprated the suspension and breaks, and gave it a 5th gear.

    Considering that engine is worth about 200bhp I bet it’s so much fun. It would cost you a fortunes in spare 4 packs of M&S underwear.

    If hazard 60 would come up at around 4s, in a are that small, it would be scary. They say it’s that torque the vtec adds that make the mini vtec such a good car. Doesn’t really need the insane speed.

    Iirc they also have it running on ethenol, so probably hitting 240bhp.

    They are currently doing some Japanese k car atm. Old micra size 4wd turbo thing.

    #10982
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 4Wheels-Of-Fire
    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 5,677

    Though i would share my experiance of a falkshall dealer from few years ago.

    My company issued me with a Vectra and I had no choice in the matter but my grade allowed me the 2.0 16V CD trim version and despite what Jeramy Clarkson says I was really quite happy with it.

    Then came time time for the first service.

    I booked the service by phone with my closest dealer in London and the nice lady said I could bring the car in at 1pm the next day. She also said that a curtecy car of similar spec to mine would be avalable and my company insurance would cover it so I didnt bother booking the hire car that my company would have paid for.

    When I arrived they told me the man who did the booking in (the nice lady apparently worked in the midlands) had gone to lunch and they couldnt do anything for an hour.

    When the man returned he first told me he had no record of my booking but after a 20 minute search he decided he did. Next he told me the only car they had was a Ford Ka 1.0 L and that my company any car insurance did not cover me to drive it anyway. After a long chat between my insurance company and the dealers head office they decided I was insured so they told me to take the Ka and return in two days.

    On my first return they told me the car would not be ready for another two days but they would throw in a free wash and valet to make up for the delay.

    On my second return I dropped off the Ka and picked up my car even though it was not washed or cleaned (they had no record of saying they would do that)

    Ten miles down the road the engine started to make a noise and the oil light came on so that lead to my third return.

    It turns out they had drained the oil and changed filter but had not put any new oil in !

    The dealer said they would now have to check the engine and do a major service (for free) but it would take a week and no they could not lend me a car as the Ka was booked to go out to another customer.

    I had to book a hire car afrer all and I finally got mine back after two weeks but you would never know it had been serviced because guess what ?

    There was no record of it in the log book !

     

     

    #10998
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 5Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,353

    That was a horrible experience, WoF! In my days as workshop manager of a large independent garage, I learned that some (OK, most) main dealerships were the equivalent of BMC workers in the 70’s. Whatever they did, they were safe in the knowledge that they were covered by a Big Gang.

    Vauxhalls in particular, were good and bad locally. The Mansfield VX dealership was a hive of incompetence, I knew the shop foreman there from childhood and would not have trusted him to oil the chain of a pushbike. The Nottingham company on the other hand, was a good place to take your motor or order parts from. Efficient and friendly: my big bro bought cars there and had a lot of good service over the years, from his first 1949 Wyvern, to his last, a Ventora, which he kept until his death in ’88. Beautiful motor, 3.3 liter engine and very comfortable.

    The Mansfield dealership was where I took my second Motability car, a 1997 Astra 1.6 auto, which had everything electrical, fully loaded and was surprisingly offered at No Deposit, as a “Special Deal”. I discovered the reasons for the Special Deal later. It was a cancelled factory order for a number of Astras, for a company which went bankrupt. VX made a deal with Motability and I suffered 3 years with a car which had ‘everything electrical’ fail. Locking doors and electric windows, sunroof – all packed in at various times. Halfway through the lease, we moved here to Lincolnshire and the lease was transferred to a Louth VX dealership, who were much improved upon the Mansfield shower. Eventually, about 3 months before the 3 years were up, it broke down about 20 miles from home. The AA was then Motability recovery and I had spent an hour tracing the fault, with my limited tools, before he arrived. It’s the ECU, I told him, I am an ex-workshop foreman with 20+ years of experience. He could not have been more condescending if he tried! He spent over an hour fiddling with various diagnostic tools, before my missus lit him up and told him to take us to the dealership. On arrival, I told the foreman what I had diagnosed, he checked and confirmed that it was a dead parrot.

    BMW dealers, at least the local Nottingham one, were ridiculously snooty. I had a customer who wanted to buy a new 325 saloon, a local estate agent who had sold up his chain and retired. He wanted us to maintain it, because he trusted us and we were local: had maintained all his family’s cars. They said no, so he walked, they kept phoning him and he said that no deal was possible until they let us maintain it. They gave in, on condition that we bought all parts from them. Problem solved, we had a lovely new Beamer to maintain. I quoted Seniority in order to work on it.?

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #11000
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 3The Duke
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 11,396

    True story.

    In the mid 90s my dads friend was diagnosed with asbestosis, before his death he wanted to surprise his wife with a 3 series,he got a big pay out, paid the house off and wanted to get her her dream wheels.

    He went to the local dealership, and was treated like dirt, as of his appearance. He opened the holdall he had, showed the sales guy the contents, probably 15k, another to cover the car, called the fellow a Cu*t and walked out.

    Bought her a merc instead.

    100% true tale. She still has the merc, or did as of a couple of years ago. He died a few months later.

    BMW near me is snooty too, as is the mini dealership next to it. If you don’t go in in shirt and trousers, they don’t even acknowledge your there. In my experience (and I have a lot) skoda, seat and mainly Toyota garages are spot on at wanting you to feel at wanted.

    Also i get my car washed at my local independent garage, it sell ok secondhand cars, from 3-10 years old. I’ve never bought a car off him, but almost every time I go to get my car washed, he will almost insist your take something  out. A really nice guy.

    Last week I took an Hyundai Coupe out for 20 mins on my own. Think it was 2010 plate, I quite like it.

    #11001
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 5Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,353

    Steve my ex-SIL (spits!) had a Hyundai coupe after leaving my daughter and doing her the only favour he ever did: agreed to a divorce. He married his secretary and turned her and others into a “model”, setting up a “modelling” showroom in Nottingham, before that business became his 5th to go TU. He had a personalised Reg. Plate – P1 ORN. Which describes the type of “modelling” undertaken at the premises. His 2nd wife then divorced him after checking into Rehab, finally realising what he had made her into. He found another woman, had my gson to stay and I discovered that he was smoking weed in front of him. I had a couple of family members visit him and “advise” that he left out inviting gson again.

    As far as dealerships go, I had a great experience with Read Hyundai at Grimsby. One of my nephews has just bought a new Tucson from another Read dealer and is very happy with how they treated him. I love that story about your dad’s mate, it illustrates exactly what BMW are like. It’s also funny how some people who own Beamers, think that the roads belong to them. I generally find those are the drivers who own a bottom-spec, smaller-engine car with the model badges removed, trying to make us believe they have a 340i or similar. LMAO to see these dreamers.

    That independent place where you wash your car, is exactly how I ran my old place: customer (or potential customer) is King. One new and fairly well-off customer once asked me if we used a carwash after a service. Yes, I said, you are talking to one of them. ?

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #11009
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 2PlaneMan
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 6,829

    The deal has been done. Pay and pick it up on Saturday.

    Had a really good look at it and there are a few tiny marks on it, none anywhere near a major depth, could barely catch a fingernail in any. The front alloys have a little scuff on each one. The interior is immaculate. Everything works, apart from the USB slot which I forgot to try.

    It has 2 new front tyres on it, can’t recall the make right now but they are at least a ton a corner. Also has new discs up front and they say pads as well.

    It drives like a new car, rock solid, no squeaks or creaks or rattles. I thought it was a bit slow but I was doing 45mph in a 30 without realising, feels like a much bigger car. Also pulls surprisingly well from low revs in completely the wrong gear. Happy to go from about 25 in 5th with very little complaining.

    The MOT was meant to have 11 months left on it which I knew was wrong, love the MOT history check site. So it’s having a brand spanking new one.

    There was no movement on the price, which was good anyway especially with the tyres and discs/ pads. 15 months warranty (via Ford Protect, the dealers have quite a few Ford franchises in other parts of the country) and a fancy paint and interior treatment were thrown in for £35. Allegedly £500 retail.

    I’m a happy person.

    #11012
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 3The Duke
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 11,396

    Exciting times. Nothing like a new car. My friend just got a new (offensive) clio, it’s actually a very nice car bar it’s blag name.

    In my mind a clio cungers up a clio Williams, now the clio is easily golf size.

    The new one has defo grown up, and jumped up in quality. I recall my mates 2002 18month model that nothing worked in. Pos it was.

    Today it’s hard to buy a bad car. A decent mid range is now a better car than the best of the 90s. Entry cars now are literally light-years away from where we was.

    As dangerous as they was, I still have a soft spot or fiat 126/500 mini etc.

    I seen a Ford pinto the other day, I don’t know how good they was in their day, but dam their design has aged well. Such a nice side profile.

    I have a mad eclectic selection in what I find good I’m cars. It’s ether sporty or stupid quirky, posh I can do with out. Though as I’m getting older, I’m getting a bit more accustomed to a bit of comfort.

    My wife, the girl that along time ago was happy being driven in an escort van, and once a 13 year old rover, now refuses to get in her days (shabby) camper van for days out (it’s very derpy lol) and last week refused to get in the kids pergeot, when i wanted to take it for a run !

    I don’t know when it happened, but she is now a car snob. One that has no interest of cars.

    Also we have been talking colours on the new Octavia(still a year away) , it’s about her only input. On the last car, my orders was “not white”. That’s it, that’s how much cars intrest her.

    So this time, I showed here the superb lime matalic green that the Vrs comes in. She just laughed and said “we are not in our 20s, I’m not getting in that.”

    So that’s a bonus. Now I’m thinking if I get a lime green Robin reliant , it will also put the kids off getting in. ?

    In reality it looks like it’s going to be satin grey and black wheels. I’d like the green,it’s very nice but I don’t year, would suit a 25yo better.

    Used car buying advice 10

    Used car buying advice 11

    It’s the estate I’m after, but couldn’t find a grey one. So what do you think green or grey

     

    #11013
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 12Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 15,572

    I agree about the (offensive) Clio blag name. I have a mental tic in that it always gets turned into something mildly obscene. I think it probably stems from the big ‘rump’ that was the most noticeable feature of the original marque.

    #11014
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 13JayCeeDee
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 5,012

    There’s a picture of a white one HERE – with details of what’s in the new facelift version.

    I’ve been researching another car too – mostly along the lines of what equipment is available on late secondhand models. Some of the tech that now comes with them is mind-blowing.

    I’ve started by checking on whether Bi-Xenons, my current ( literally brilliant ) lights, have been bettered by LED headlights. It seems they are blown away!!

    The Audi Matrix System – HERE – and the Merc’s Active Multibeam LED – HERE – show how much things have moved on in just the last few years. These will all filter down to other makes very quickly as has been the case before.

     


    @sgb101
    – with the facelift versions out a few months now, a year should be adequate to iron out any niggles.

    #11015
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 14StevieP
    @steviep
    Forumite Points: 150

    Steve, while I must admit to liking that metallic green the wife has that dark blue colour on her VRS. It was only found on the VRS at one time but it seems to be getting around the VAG range now, there’s a beautiful Golf R around here that I drool over with the same colour.

    Used car buying advice 15

    #11017
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 13JayCeeDee
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 5,012

    It’s the estate I’m after, but couldn’t find a grey one. So what do you think green or grey

    There’s always this one

    Used car buying advice 17

    #11018
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 2PlaneMan
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 6,829

    I’ve never been a fan of ‘shouty’ colours-bright green/orange – that kind of thing. I also dislike washed out colours.

    Silver to me is just a cop-out choice, white is OK at a push but I really like red, black and dark blue.

    I had a taxi last week and that was a Skoda Superb, brand new with a very odd black paint job, it wasn’t blck as such just a really really dark blue but you had to be closer than about 10 feet to notice the difference. The car was lovely and the paint job was also great.

    #11019
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 2PlaneMan
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 6,829

    Found a handy app that lets you see info about a car, most of it for free.

    Vehicle Smart.

    #11021
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 5Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,353

    Enjoy the Suzuki Nolan, hope it lasts a good few years.

    Steve, why not red? My Forest – supporting family was not best pleased when I had a blue C-Max. All of them have red cars: two nieces have white motorhomes and had differently-coloured stripes resprayed red. Now my Tucson is red, not because of their disapproval, but because I like it, although  SWMBO does not, but she chose the Deep Impact blue for the C-Max.

    The only green I like, is a light pastel green, such as the green on my favourite uncle’s old Standard 8 was. Car went before he did, by 2 years. I like the colour of JCD’s Octavia Combi, though. Ford once had a colour “Teal” that I ordered in 2007 for the first C-Max, because it was a gorgeous color IMO. They changed all the factory colours, dropped Teal, offered a nice Racing red and an upgrade to Titanium for the same deposit. TBH, I would have preferred the Teal. My neighbour across the way has a son with an old Emerald green Peugeot. I call it ‘Bilious green’. Another has a Carer with a brown metallic Focus, I call that ‘Dogturd Metallic’.

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #11037
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 2PlaneMan
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 6,829

    Enjoy the Suzuki Nolan, hope it lasts a good few years.

    Thanks Bob.

    Did the insurance yesterday and almost keeled over, I’ve been driving for 26 odd years, never had so much as a parking ticket. Never caused an accident, nothing. OK I have no-no claims but the cheapest I could find was £520 (Should get near £30 cashback).

    How the hell do new drivers afford their own insurance? Or do they all do the old trick of being a named driver while actually being the main driver?

    #11038
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 13JayCeeDee
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 5,012

    That’s all a thing of the past now, Nolan. See ABI info HERE.

     

    It’s the No-Claims that’s killing you. Unfortunately you’re classified the same as a new driver if you don’t have a No-Claims to carry over. Happened to a relative of mine that came back to the UK after 8 years in France.

    Have you been doing it yourself?? Our relative got a better deal than she – or I – could get on-line, by going through a broker.

    #11039
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 2PlaneMan
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 6,829

    Talked to a few brokers, best they could was £650.

    The bit that really wound me up was I’ve been a named driver on my mum’s policy for about 12 years, that was largely ignored.

    #11040
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 5Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,353

    You’re welcome, Nolan.

    Yep – it’s a big expense for even experienced, long-term drivers with a good long NCB. For young people under 25, it’s crippling. Living in East Lincolnshire, with villages and workplaces miles apart, means that many young people leave as soon as they can. Not because they want to, but because they cannot afford the cost of commuting, fuel and insurance. My 20-yo gdaughter drives a 55 Kia Picanto and was lucky to find a chef job at a restaurant only 3 miles from her village. That lowers the cost of fuel to the point where she can afford the huge monthly Insurance payments. She will not go on dad’s policy, says it’s not fair on him. Now she has a regular, steady BF, who lives and works in Grantham, she may leave to be near him, as also her workplace is up for sale. Her 18 yo brother will start his last year of electrical engineering and IT, at Grimsby College in September. He has a special College bus to get to work, which picks him up at 7:15 am and gets him back at around 6:30. He is picked up first and dropped off last. It’s around 25 miles from his home. He wants to learn to drive, but no local School will pick him up from his village, so he is phoning around Grimsby Driving Schools for lessons when he has an afternoon end at college, on Thursdays and Fridays. I hate to think what he will have to pay for insurance if he passes his tests, but he says he is saving for a van, not a car, as he has a job lined for next year and wants a van for (a) work and (b) so he does not have to take more than his best mate with him in the van!

    Is there any wonder why so many young kids ‘forget’ to renew insurance? I don’t condone that, but I can understand it. A majority, financially punished because of the minority. I am so grateful for Motability and ‘free’ insurance. Don’t think I would be driving now, if it was not for that.

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #11041
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 3The Duke
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 11,396

    Insurance has always been stupid. My first policy quote I got was  for a cavalier and over £3k. My first insurance was for a van,  they are cheaper than cars, escort van worth all of £400 (give or take) was £700, but a move to France brought it down to £400.

    Then after that for the last 15 years my insurance has been £300+/- £20.

    My girls current insurance is relativly cheap at £700 on a learner licence, but on passing it goes up to £2100 is the cheapest. Funny enough my lad is also learning, for him on the same car is £700 but “only” goes up to £1800 on passing.

    About 3 years ago a friend passed and her insurance for a Citroën c3 was £2100, she lives in Manchester, the price for my a dress would of be for her £1500.

    So for as long as ive been driving, young and inexperienced drivers get stung hard, but from my experiance location plays a big role in prices too.

    Also being married and having kids brings premium ls down to.

    #11052
    Participant
    Used car buying advice 5Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,353

    So for as long as ive been driving, young and inexperienced drivers get stung hard, but from my experiance location plays a big role in prices too. Also being married and having kids brings premium ls down to.

    First time I really noticed that outside of myself, was when my son had his first. Before (shotgun) marriage and first ankle-biter, he was foot-to-the-floor everywhere and tailgating, I was continually nagging his driving. After collecting his daughter from hospital,* he was driving very carefully, very suddenly.

    *she lasted another 4 years until he manged to elbow the b**ch and keep the kids.

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

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