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Why such a carp Christmas

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This topic contains 32 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by The Duke 10 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #29661

    RSB
    Keymaster
    @bdthree

    I mentioned in the Forumite post that I may of been a little put out 🙂 Anyhow the main reason for this was decorating. One of those thing’s that should be straight forward 😉 None the less the house is pre 2nd war “1928 from what I have gathered” and I really do believe it was built by pissed up Irish men. Walls that have moved over time, floor boards literally running under walls and coming out the other side and bizarre beams and pipes that seem to go nowhere. But the biggest problem was the plaster, I do not believe its seen any new plaster since the outside toilets went. I would say 40 years! Well, that is in the room I am working on anyhow, it could be worse in the next as know it’s layout of the walls has not been altered since it was built.

    So what started out as quick clean-up is turning out to be a nightmare.

    But what I am doing is getting rid of as much extensions, cables and all the other crap. So starting with this room and then all the other rooms they are getting new sockets with USB plus an extra socket with WPS “See Here”. I am also fitting network ports in room plus tv arial sockets and phone sockets. I am doing all this while the plaster is off. Channeling out the brick is an arse and Ill be coughing up red brick for weeks to come although I did receive some dust masks this evening.

    Apart from the plug sockets all the other wires are converging into one cupboard/cloak room 3ft x 4ft on the end of the landing. I did not want to put them in the cold cellar. I will need a switch as each room will have it’s own network port.

    Let me add, I have never got plastered, I hate painting and hanging wallpaper and I am still wondering why I started this over the crimbo period. Anyhow, the way I look at it I have got most of the worst out of the way which was channeling out for the wires and back plates. I have everything I need to push on including all the above I mentioned minus wall paper and flooring.

    Americans: Over Sexed, Over Payed and Over here, Wat Wat!

Viewing 20 replies - 1 through 20 (of 32 total)
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  • #29662

    blacklion1725
    Participant
    @blacklion1725
    Forumite Points: 1,873

    I feel your pain mate – been through all that at various stages in this and previous gaff.  Power tools make chasing easier but dust clouds galore. When I moved in to this house (25 years ago) found all the wiring was ancient with disintegrating ceramic insulation (not picked up by the survey surprise surprise), I kicked everyone out and spent a weekend rewiring the whole place. Not fun. Light at the end of the tunnel though for you by the sounds of it.

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    #29663

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 5,655

    Good luck with that Lee.

    I got knackered putting up a new blind in mum’s spare room not long ago, took about 3 hours in total, non-ruined me would have done it and had been starting a beer in 30 minutes.

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    #29664

    Richard
    Participant
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 2,303

    Sadly old plaster does go off if it does not get the attention and treatment it needs. With a 1928 build was it lime plaster or the more modern stuff. You could need to be careful what you apply to what, lime breaths while modern concrete plasters do not and this can cause all sorts of issues. Do not count on me as an expert it is just that I have seen and heard too many problems over the years. Building walls onto floor boards is still quite common though these days walls are often a few bit of stud work, some sound/heat insulation and a bit of plasterboard. They may or may not be load bearing, just as brick and blockwork may or may not be load bearing. One hazard of older places is that a previous owner/abuser could have caused long hidden issues. I have seen images of places where structural movement came about during the war or when ground works caused ‘upsets’. Is the wiring up to current standards if you are re-socketing the place? Planning regulations Part P(?), have introduced several/many restrictions on the works that non ticketed people can perform on installations. Happily I can now rule myself out of such major works as redecorating; dealing with other ongoing issues is enough.

    You can buy or hire chasing machines that have a form of dust collection, but make sure the cutters will work with you wall type.

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    #29666

    RSB
    Keymaster
    @bdthree
    Forumite Points: 2,136

    @sawboman There was mention of black lime the week before I started this when the bathroom was being done.

    Americans: Over Sexed, Over Payed and Over here, Wat Wat!

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    #29673

    Tippon
    Keymaster
    @tippon
    Forumite Points: 2,646

    It sounds like you’re doing out my house ?

    We found out when we moved in that because the street is split level with a basement at the back, that some people had dug the basement out to the front wall, giving them an extra room. Sounded like a good idea so I made a start. Knocked a doorway through at the bottom of the stairs and went in, only to find that the builders had dumped the rubble into the front half of the room, and someone had done the same when they refurbished the bathroom. I could see a pipe coming through the dividing wall and going into the rubble, so took my time clearing around it until I found out it went nowhere. Also found out that there’s what looks like a stream under the house…

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    #29679

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 7,573

    Ditto all the luck/good wishes.

    One thing I have found to be useful over the years is to take project photos both during demolition, after removal of carp just before the new stuff goes in and during reconstruction. Over the years such photos have come in handy when things go wrong. It has saved me unnecessary floor board removal and made it easier to plan further changes. (most handy if the boiler condensate line plugs!)

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    #29682

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 4,228

    I’ve been in my house sing 2005, It wad biupt in 1913, and we have replasterd most rooms that needed it except the hall stars and landing, that’s just been painted and carpeted over the years.

    Next door have at some point pre 2005 replaces their shot hall stairs and landing plaster which backs on to our stirs, so any plaster of our that was clinging on, was finished off when they took theirs off.so only The wall paper holds the plaster to the walls.

    Like my my team, next year will be the year I tackle hat job. Thr issue is, you csn isolate a room fro the rest of the house when remevating, but not with the HSL. So each year it gets pushed down the list of jobs.

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    #29684

    Wheels-Of-Fire
    Participant
    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 3,404

    Back in the 1920’s they treated breeze block in much the same way as we treat a stud partition now so it was not unusual to lay the floor boards and then build the partition on top. Sometimes they followed the line of a joist, sometimes they didn’t !

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    #29687

    JayCeeDee
    Participant
    @jayceedee
    Forumite Points: 3,753

    +1 !! It’s amazing how easy the options can be assessed, knowing where those pipes and cables run, if you need to saw a floorboard to get it up.

    Lee – get some photos of the cable runs before you plaster – handy next time you want to hang a picture.

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    #29689

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 4,228

    JCD even harder now on new builds, as alto for the cupboard floor bards are interlocking and 2″x8″ so half the time when you need access, you’ll cut a square out, with a circular saw (raise the blade to 18mm first mm ) , then have to bridge it with two battons to put the cutout back baxk flush.

    Eventually the patch will squeek, so some good flexible glue on the Batton is a must, before you screw it all down.

     

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    #29691

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,257

    The Blidworth NCB estate house that I grew up in was one of 840 “Pit Houses” built in 1926. Unfortunately for my dad and the other miners who travelled to work there during 1926 to 1928 from all around Britain, geological problems forced closure in 1928. My parents had arrived, with dad’s brother and family, as the 11th and 12th tenants of  Lord Newstead’s ‘Newstead Colliery Company’ estate. Dad and mam, with my big brother Eric a 2 yo baby, moved to another Nottinghamshire pit, then another, until Blidworth colliery reopened in 1931, now with another son, born in 1930 and still living, although with severe dementia now, at 89.

    The 840 houses were therefore empty and abandoned for almost 5 years. In 1992 I bought a mid-terraced Pit House at the upper end of the village, the whole estate having been built on the banks of a fairly steep hill: I had grown up in a house at the bottom of the hill, in the Dale. We invested in several improvements, from SUDG windows and doors to moving the downstairs bathroom/WC upstairs, expanding the lounge into the area of the old bathroom and substituting Gas for solid fuel heating, with new boiler and radiators. I had never considered the structure of these properties, so imagine my surprise when the engineer began taking up floorboards and crawling under the house to fit piping! The floorboards extended underneath every wall and there was nothing but hard-packed earth below. Only the chimney stack and outer walls were on foundations. Plastering was carried out by a builder mate who also carried out the extension into the old bathroom space. I had once tried plastering and realised why all plasterers have large arms, so I left it to an expert whilst I rebuilt the engine, brakes, tipper hydraulics/mechanism, steering and suspension of his next truck. Tip for aspiring boxers: never mind the roadwork, get plastering!

    It is surprising how the houses have lasted so long: all have been bought, either by ex-miners, a local Housing Association, or sold by the ex-miners (at a good profit) to new owners. We sold ours to the son of a mate who came down to work at the pit in the early 60’s, after the first wave of Lanarkshire pit closures in Scotland.

    Considering the facts that the housing was empty for all that time, and the estate streets were built on the banks of a steep hill, I find it amazing that they have not begun to deteriorate, after 92 years. Perhaps they might have been subjected to subsidence, as the pit was at the top of the hill and very close to the top street. However, the Colliery Company decided early that a substantial “Pillar” should be left below the estate, in view of the geological problems. I know that housing built farther out, has experienced subsidence problems. The original garage at which I became foreman, suffered subsidence and had to be rebuilt with British Coal compensation, further up the hill opposite the pit. We got a spanking new workshop, paint oven and MOT Centre. My dad got £200 when he retired from the pit in 1965…. where is the morality in that?

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #29692

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 4,228

    My house doesn’t have foundations, built on compacted pot-ash, and a 4 wide brick foundation that goes up like  a pyrimid (so 3 courses, untill it breaks ground level then at the rear of the house  2 normal double course (no cavity) then a slate damp course. The front is probably  foot high to the damp corse level. Due to the topography.

    So the rear half of the house has a quarry tiled floor just on pot Ash, under the wooden floor I laid. The front half has wooden beams and floor boards. With a celer that goes form nothing to 9 foot in the space of 20 feet.  I once put my head in 12 years ago.

    This was normal procedure back in the day. Though in my houses case the pot ash foundation is staght onto the mountain rock. Most are potash on clay.

    Ive offen though cos my house is the end house, and has a good 9 foot to the side path, then another 9 or so more down to the next bungalow underneath . One day it will just slide off and squash the bungalow.

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    #29696

    Wheels-Of-Fire
    Participant
    @grahamdearsley
    Forumite Points: 3,404

    My sister and her then husband brought a terraced farmworkers cottage that was built in the 1840’s. The foundations were nothing more than a few sacks of lime poured directly onto the clay that it stands on.

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    #29700

    Ed P
    Participant
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 7,573

    Any house surviving from the 1840s is obviously built on stable clay. However if you are buying an old house (or new for that matter) beware of clay it is not benign stuff at all!

    Do check the geology for any prospective purchase. The British Geological Society (BGS)is a good start, and look there or elsewhere for info on unstable slopes and subsidence. If you find clay find out from the seller if there is a history of houses breaking their backs in that area. This can be a especial problem if the house is on a slope or ridge line. If you can try and get detailed geology bore-hole data for the area and look out for mudstone layers interspersed with clay – this is almost a guarantee that subsidence and house back-breaking will take place. (The mud stone acts like a perforated water channel, and after rain it will cause nearby dried-out clay to swell. If the whole house goes up and down fine, but its a real problem if only half the house does. Modern builds should be piled to avoid this, if not smell a rat. Idiot insurance companies will blame nearby trees and cut them down, rather than investigate the geology – this actually can make the problem worse over time.)

    Obviously old pit workings and sand sink holes can cause similar problems but again the BGS is a good start.

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    #29702

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 4,228

    Oh, the mountain I live on is an old lead mine, founded by the Romans, and used for a long time. I know a shaft runs parrell to my house about 60 foot behind the house.

    There is an old small garden centre, that the owner want to build on, and they done a servery and got refused. So I the worst of all worlds. In not to fused. Its late over 100 years and Im not planning on going anywhere.

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    #29708

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 5,655

    Near the end of my mother’s cul de sac they built a new housing estate about 7 years ago, mostly ‘executive’ but some smaller and ‘social housing’ tucked away in a corner down the bottom. Social housing is the only reason planning permission was granted (apart from brown envelopes passed under the table).  The people in the village were stunned as there is a ravine, japanese knotweed, and a old tunnel from when there was a quarry which has been knackered since the mid 60’s to early 70’s.

    The ravine wasn’t filled properly, the knotweed wasn’t removed properly (uncovered lorries going up and down the A4232 and  then M4) and the tunnel filled with old bricks.

    No surprise that 3  of the £600,000+ houses had the foundations shift, another £400,000 odd one had the drains collapse and one has been underpinned 3 times to my knowledge. The last house has been ‘bought’ 5 times in 7 years, all by shill companies of the developer. No actual person has ever owned that house.

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    #29715

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,257

    There is a (possibly 5 yo) development of what was meant to be 9 ‘executive’ houses in Louth, about 3 miles from our village centre to the street, in what was a patch of waste* ground. The house numbers ran along one side of the street, and the street name was just one letter different to our Close, something I did not know for a long time. This led to problems for us: for over a year we received letters for a guy with a double-barrelled family name from the AA. I sent some back and just kept receiving more and more, eventually receiving a red demand letter. So I investigated, found the development and discovered it had run into trouble. Numbers 1,2 and 3 had been completed, as had 7, 8 and 9. Where 4, 5 and 6 should have been, was a patch of waste ground, overgrown with brambles and weed. Not a good advert for ‘Executive Homes’!

    Unfortunately one of those numbers matched my own door number, which was why the AA did not believe I was the double-barrelled barsteward living at my address. They failed to notice the additional letter in the house name and they failed to investigate the fact that my wife and I had been the sole tenants here since 2003. I collated all the necessary information and sent it with an acid complaint letter to the then new CEO of the AA. I received an apology and the AA letters ceased, but the apology contained an offer of free AA membership for 12 months. I refused the offer based upon two factors:

    1 – I was a Motability customer and was therefore a recipient of RAC free membership.

    2 – I could have no faith in any organisation which had demonstrated such glaring inefficiency and lack of competence as demonstrated by its administration’s inability to deal with more than 12 months of complaints from me, regarding one issue.

    *No’s 4, 5 and 6 are still represented by an even wilder patch of waste ground, and should be properly called “Common Land”. When I worked at a County Council HQ, part of my work in Legal Services involved dealing with potential buyers of Common Land, usually developers, who are charged a substantial fee twice over, by the solicitor representing them to the Council, and by the Council itself. Quite how this bunch managed to cock up their project is not clear, but No’s 1 to 9 (4 to 6 exclusive) are still uninhabited. A lesson to all would-be Property tycoons!

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #29727

    The Duke
    Moderator
    @sgb101
    Forumite Points: 4,228

    I’ve said this before in sure, but at the rear of my FiL house, is a valley that looks up to my house on the other side. (my side is higher and looks over his to the sea. Anyhow, close to his there was a Small wooldalnd with protected spices.

    A well know build company, wad tyring to get permission to build. the council said that they could employ some one to carful burrow into the wood and see that’s in it. A week later the ripped the lot on while everyone isn work, and said ‘nope nothing their.’

    They later apologied said they mis understood ‘see what’s in there’, took a small fine and built there 6 houses.

    Our of principle they should never of been allowed to build in the bourgh again. But it was all obvious alot of back handers and funny hand shakes.

    You rearly win agsisnts these big firms, they have the councilors in their pockets, before they even start down the road.

    It was a real shame, at thso small pat h of woodland was that dencesly packed I doubt any human had stpeded foot there for 100s if not a 1000 years. To was a sanctuary to may foxes, badgers, lizards and birds. You know countryside shit. It, and they are gone. To the virus known as man.

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    #29736

    Bob Williams
    Participant
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 5,257

    Steve, I was shown a few instances of historical corruption and several just plain errors when I was dealing with Common land Searches. The corruption had been covered up, but the errors led to the Council being fined, often large sums: these repaid with taxpayers and ratepayers’ money of course. This was shown to me by my immediate female superior as an object lesson in what could happen if I made such an error, and I was informed that the law had changed to make the Council Officer solely responsible for the error. Unfortunately for her, a Senior Legal Officer was present and shot her down in flames – “That is incorrect, no such change in the law has been made, in fact could not ever be contemplated. As a Legal Clerk and a new employee’s superior and mentor, you could be liable to disciplinary action against you for giving him incorrect, illegal information.”

    Exit one red-faced “Mentor”. This woman was evil IMO. Some months later, she tried to shift the blame for an error of her own on to me, by forging my signature upon the documents which gave permission for a developer to purchase land which she had not fully investigated. It was found to be an owned land and that cost the Council refunds to the developer and his solicitor. Again, she was unfortunate, as well as incompetent: she failed to check the dates when I was supposed to have created and signed the documents – I was off sick that week, proven by pay checks. She also failed to copy my signature with any similarity whatsoever: a comparison with my many sig’s on other documents, demonstrated the glaringly obvious forgery.

    Now you would have thought that this witch woman would have been sacked, wouldn’t you? Not a bit of it. She remained in her post, and I was moved to another office, still carrying out the same work and having to return to her office to use the computer dedicated to my work and hers. My ongoing revenge was to leave work later than her, and put in a password to access the PC. I would return next morning to find her accusing me of breaking the PC. I would just restart it, input the password and ask in innocence what the problem was. I was driving her even crazier than she already was, until the Council retired me on ill health grounds. How she remained in her post was down to knowing something about something or someone, I believe.

    Whatever the answer, it demonstrates what happens in ALL Council HQ’s. People there are often in ‘jobs for life’ and some become lazy, leading to incompetence and negligence. They are not all the same: I had many friends there doing their work efficiently, competently and with integrity.

    If it’s the Psychic Network why do they need a phone number?

    What’s right is what’s left if you do everything else wrong.

    If women ran the world we wouldn’t have wars, just intense negotiations every 28 days.
    --- Robin Williams

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    #29737

    PlaneMan
    Moderator
    @planeman
    Forumite Points: 5,655

    Sunday morning I took this photo, the land has had many planning applications over the years, 2 were actually passed only to be dissolved due to blatant bungs to council members. They ‘resigned’. No criminal charges were ever made, of course.

    The latest attempt was thrown out about 10 weeks ago after the ‘impact on the village and wildlife’ was ripped to shreds by many people, myself included (I emailed the bloke who was heading up the group opposing the development on safety grounds). There were many blatant lies, my favourite is probably ‘ no impact on reptiles or small mammals, birds or any other wildlife’. Bottom of the planning application in a tiny font ‘no wildlife survey completed’.  I know for a fact that there are rare reptiles over in the field, last time I was there (4 years maybe) I saw 2 adders and some slow worms.

    Another good one was ‘no impact on traffic or village amenities.’ 60 flats, 90 car parking spaces and they would be joining a very busy main road, used by ambulances and other emergency services.  The local primary school is over subscribed as is.

    Not even the corrupt council could pass that planning application.

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