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Wind Farm Construction

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  • #39600
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 2Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2

    Next month the new WF begins construction at Tritton Knoll here in lovely Lincs. This is the sub station:

    http://tinyurl.com/raczl5h

    Follow this Local News link and scroll down to find the report. Check out the massive first stages of each turbine in the photos, courtesy of the BBC. We can go down the coast to watch all this happening, it makes a change of activity from the Netherlands company re-nourishing the beaches: they had to start earlier this year. Dredging, pumping, grading, levelling and scraping the beaches was all done in time for the WF’s to begin.

    http://tinyurl.com/raonrp6

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

Viewing 15 replies - 21 through 35 (of 35 total)
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  • #39755
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 3Mark Turner
    @turner74
    Forumite Points: 695

    Steve

    I agree I go fishing down that stretch quite a bit park the car up come back its full of shit I think all the holiday parks down that stretch have played a big  part in the amount of gulls that are present. Bob we normally go over to Skeggy for a long weekend at least once a year I have seen the extent of the wind farms part of the North Wale coastline is pretty much the same with more and more being erected as Steve probably sees everyday.

    #39760
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 4Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 15,896

    Interestingly the Energy Industry is now starting to realise the huge costs of decommissioning Wind Farms. The first farm near Blythe was decommissioned in 2019 and based on that the Government estimates that the industry needs to set aside about £3Bn for future decommissioning. link

    Although decisions on the degree of restoration required for  on-shore sites is fairly straightforward, offshore is a different matter. The FoE (aptly named) used distorted science to claim that redundant offshore oil installations were a hazard to the environment. In practice it has been found that old oil-rig marine reefs are extremely good for marine life. I guess therefore that offshore windfarm decommissioning will be a balance between leaving reefs as spawning sites and demolishing reefs that are trawling/navigation hazards or visual blots.

    #39765
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 5Richard
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 6,517

    The Blyth link was interesting though I wonder how valid any conclusion could be. It was really little more than a two unit research project using what are now considered almost ‘domestic size toys’. The entire set up produced less than half of one new unit so was long longer worthwhile. There were also comments suggesting that 20 year life spans are now being upped to 25 years. That Blyth is being abandoned also appeared to be contestable, the suggestion being that new technology might well still be deployed at the site in the future since the site itself as ‘proven’. I am not surprised that disposal facilities are not yet available since the scale of dismantling is too small to yet warrant large investment. With marine sites, I assume that a dismantling ship may well be involved. A dedicated vessel able to take down old gear, shred unusable parts, erect replacements and hold reusable kit would appear to be a sensible answer to avoid multiple handling. I am not surprised it does not exist at present.

    I sincerely doubt that the emerging generation of installations will be a one shot wonder to be abandoned after 20 years, replaced or augmented after 20~30 years appears rather more likely with an emerging new business of managing the replacement cycle being a vital part of the future process.

    Perhaps I share your apparent lack of taste for so called FoE, (a foe to everything) and Greennoise. Both make their turn by bigging up every disaster they dream up. Why anyone should have any sympathy with their wild unthinking protests and lack of alternative ideas is for others to guess.

    #39766
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 4Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 15,896

    For clarity I was not using ‘decommissioning’ as an argument against wind power. Just that it is a factor (like maintenance) that needs to be comprehended in the design. Without further info I assume that decommissioning becomes a requirement when structural issues become too large to handle by patch-up maintenance. Repowering with better technology would then be an option.

    I would hope that the servicing of rotating/rubbing parts (bearings, bushes etc.) is built into their routine maintenance, but it must be one hell of a challenge as it would be difficult to lower the gearbox/turbine onto a barge. Replacing a damaged sail would be a mammoth task and hardly routine!

    #39774
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 5Richard
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 6,517

    From what I have seen and heard, (though not from my source in a little while) routine maintenance work is both planned and undertaken. The designs have been improved over time to make it less arduous. This might be one factor out of several that make gearboxes less of an issue. I believe, though have not had this stated to me, that telemetry checks pretty much constantly and any detected change out of normal running is instantly highlighted. Blade failure is highly undesirable, it tends to be very destructive. I believe they are planned to last for the life of the installation. However, unless the failure was destructive, I guess similar methods are used to remove and install any new item. I do not expect they are yet stock items, certainly not from B&Q, Wicks  or ScrewFix!

    Eon, did not appear to see decommissioning as a huge issue for them and I believe that they have a bit of experience. Rather, they were suggesting that it was part of routine planning, maintenance and capital allocation for them. Having said that, blades are possibly the biggest issue for a dismantling and recycling operation, hence my suggestion of using a purpose built vessel.

    #39775
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 4Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 15,896

    Just out of interest I did a two minute search on Wind Turbine maintenance, and it looks like skilled maintenance personnel (able to work at heights) may be a critical manpower shortage. I counted over 500 vacancies in different categories!

    There may of course be double/triple-counting in this as there are dozens of support companies servicing this industry.

    #39777
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 5Richard
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 6,517

    After careful consideration, I think I will give retraining to fill the gap a pass. Whatever the number of vacancies or double, triple or more counts there are it is not the job for me. It is a rather specialist role I suspect.

    I guess that with the expansion of the sector some growing pains might be expected. A shortage of trained personnel could be one example of such a situation. Of course, poor pay for the risks could be a problem. I wonder how big the expected employment count should be. Perhaps 500 vacancies with a roll of 35,000 jobs might be expected, 500 vacancies out of 1,000 available posts would be painful.

    #39796
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 2Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,443

    Steve I agree I go fishing down that stretch quite a bit park the car up come back its full of shit I think all the holiday parks down that stretch have played a big part in the amount of gulls that are present. Bob we normally go over to Skeggy for a long weekend at least once a year I have seen the extent of the wind farms part of the North Wale coastline is pretty much the same with more and more being erected as Steve probably sees everyday.

    Have you been down to Gibraltar Point while in Skeg Mark? There is also the North Sea Observatory at Chapel St. Leonards.

    Gib Point:     http://tinyurl.com/yy28cy3e

    The NSO:     http://tinyurl.com/vn3jhqn

    Best beach on our coast, and a change from Skeggy, is Sutton on Sea:   http://tinyurl.com/rh5bnl6

    All worth a visit.

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #39800
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 3Mark Turner
    @turner74
    Forumite Points: 695

    Bob

    We went down to Gibraltar point once just to find it with the intention of going again but haven’t made it back there. This time of year would be good to get down there with the seals pupping or pupped as the case may be. We once left Grimsby on the way in after a greasy spoon brekkie and the satnav took us the scenic route (little back roads) down to Ingoldmells via Mablethorpe and Chapel St Leonards but we haven’t been back up that way to visit. Donna Nook is on my to do list at some point.

    Mark

    #39808
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 2Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,443

    Seals are all pupped now Mark, record numbers this year again at Donna Nook.   http://tinyurl.com/w93gno3

    Next time you go to Donna Nook, try the Axe & Cleaver at North Somercotes for a meal, their food is good:

    http://tinyurl.com/srf7gf2

    Have you been to Cleethorpes? Missus and I go there a lot, if you have kids the Cleethorpes Coast Light Railway is a good trip, we used to take the grandkids but the youngest is now 14 and has other stuff to do. The Pier has great fish & chips, all Grimsby fish as fresh as can be. But there is an even better place in the town, up on St. Peter’s Way: the Ocean Fish Restaurant.

    The Armed Forces Weekend at Cleethorpes is a great day out: usually a flypast by the BBMF and lots of other aircraft, with a Para display. Place gets packed, so if you decide to go, ask me nearer the time and I will tell you where to park.

     

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #39868
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 5Richard
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 6,517

    Scottish wind farming has a problem at the moment. It now appears it is currently more profitable not to produce power than to be paid for its production. There is a glut of wind power in Scotland which has in the minds of some over built. A special high voltage interconnect was built to allow the excess to be sent to Wales, but the thing has proved to be something other than reliable. It tripped out on the 10th of January, apparently it is still being investigated. Meanwhile, the windmill owners are getting paid, in fact, they earn more for not selling anything. Is this welcome to renewable money?

    #39873
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 4Ed P
    @edps
    Forumite Points: 15,896

    You have an analogous situation in Cornwall (& Devon?) where installation of new solar panels are being strictly rationed as there is no way to deal with localised excesses. Just to rub salt in the wound  they need to fire up a gas turbine when its raining to cover shortages. Some way of storing low grade power is an essential in the sunnier spots of the UK – mandatory ev cars?

    #39886
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 2Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,443

    Yesterday one of my 3 mile bashes resulted in views from Skeg Pier. Very nice day, sunny and not as cold as we thought.

    From the side of the Pier, looking North, just a faint trace of a turbine.

    Wind Farm Construction 16

    From the end of the Pier, (not a long walk!) looking straight out to sea. Sea was good, tide ebbing, some good rollers further south. Turbines are just about visible. I keep forgetting to take my Canon.

    Wind Farm Construction 17

    Drove right up to the last car park north (cheaper, £2 all day) Walked to the shore and then a good walk further north towards Chapel. Walked south to the Pier, another mile or so further south, had a meal, turned back and walked all the way back to the north car park, drove home. Made SWMBO a cuppa and she slept 3 hours. No stamina, these youngsters! 😋😊

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

    #39888
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 5Richard
    @sawboman
    Forumite Points: 6,517

    Your images certainly captured the essence of what made that stretch appeal as it basked in the winter sunshine. The wind harvesters are barely visible. I cannot understand the negative comments they sometimes produce from those who cannot be affected. If you can see them, their slow turning sails are a graceful addition not an intrusive block.

    We had a good day here, but two dog walks and a shuffle to the post pox were enough for me. I have managed 25% of my week’s activity target on the first day of the week as I try to break out of the painful limits I currently face. The pavement is narrow and alongside a 40 mph road for part of the way to the post box. It is not an ideal walking route for a dog that is not a relaxed walker. So, the dog walk and the post box walk are two different journeys. It would be a car journey to the post box if the weather was cold, rainy and blustery, or not be a journey at all until a better day came along.

    Why are the wind harvesters called renewables, you either harvest today’s wind or lose it and hope for something more tomorrow. Nothing is renewed, neither is sunlight renewed, that is also ‘use-it-or-lose-it’, with no other option.

    #39892
    Participant
    Wind Farm Construction 2Bob Williams
    @bullstuff2
    Forumite Points: 13,443

    Hope you feel better soon Richard.

    I can relate to your post box journey, but in a different way. Our village lies along a series of sharp bends on the A157 Louth to Mablethorpe road, a Holiday Route* and supposedly 30  MPH limit, which is ignored by almost every vehicle except locals, who carry out my manoeuvre of slowing them down by keeping to the limit in front of them. One of the worst bends is sited opposite the village shop and we take our lives in our hands crossing the road. Best approach is to find a spot where we can see as much of the road in both directions before taking our chances, and repeat the procedure recrossing the road, but from a different position. What makes this worse is that those residents who live on the same side as the shop, have no footway whatsoever on their side, so have to cross and recross twice. The bends are signed, but not always realised by truck drivers: over the years we have had one livestock truck full of piglets overturned, and a huge truck with a large static park home drop its load onto what was the Post Office, before the RM closed it. The last incident missed one resident local by perhaps a foot.

    I had to smile at your comment, ” Why are the wind harvesters called renewables … ” – you are quite right of course, I never considered it in that light before.

    *Used to be hordes of caravans, mobile homes and other grockles in the season only, but they are slowly increasing in the winter too, now that the climate is allowing that. Not many of them watch and inwardly digest the weather forecast though: they come in sunshine and go home as soon as it rains.

    When the Thought Police arrive at your door, think -
    I'm out.

Viewing 15 replies - 21 through 35 (of 35 total)
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